heinous

(redirected from hainous)

hei·nous

 (hā′nəs)
adj.
1. Wicked; abominable: a heinous crime.
2. Informal Very unappealing; ugly: showed up wearing that heinous shirt.

[Middle English, from Old French haineus, from haine, hatred, from hair, to hate, from Frankish *hatjan.]

hei′nous·ly adv.
hei′nous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

heinous

(ˈheɪnəs; ˈhiː-)
adj
evil; atrocious
[C14: from Old French haineus, from haine hatred, from hair to hate, of Germanic origin; see hate]
ˈheinously adv
ˈheinousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hei•nous

(ˈheɪ nəs)

adj.
utterly reprehensible or evil; odious; abominable: a heinous offense.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French haineus=haine hatred + -eus -ous]
hei′nous•ly, adv.
hei′nous•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.heinous - extremely wicked, deeply criminalheinous - extremely wicked, deeply criminal; "a flagitious crime"; "heinous accusations"
wicked - morally bad in principle or practice
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

heinous

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

heinous

adjective
Disgracefully and grossly offensive:
Archaic: enormous.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
katalakauhea

heinous

[ˈheɪnəs] ADJatroz, nefasto
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

heinous

[ˈheɪnəs ˈhiːnəs] adjodieux/euse, atroce
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

heinous

[ˈheɪnəs] adj (frm) → nefando/a, atroce
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Not God omnipotent, for Fate, yet so Perhaps thou shalt not Die, perhaps the Fact Is not so hainous now, foretasted Fruit, Profan'd first by the Serpent, by him first Made common and unhallowd: ere one tastes; Nor yet on him found deadly; he yet lives, Lives, as thou saidst, and gaines to live as Man Higher degree of Life, inducement strong To us, as likely tasting to attaine Proportional ascent, which cannot be But to be Gods, or Angels Demi-gods.
A good example of the virulence of the attacks against backbiters is The Evil Tongue Tryed and Found Guilty (1672), in which Stephen Ford denounces "the hainous, horrid, and hurtful nature of the sin of slandering" (92).
Left alone in the castle while her father leads an army against the Moors, Jacinta is raped by Roderick and held captive, lamenting the "heavy hainous wrong" (3.1.8) (1) that she has suffered.
But if we be negligent in this cause of God, then hee himselfe will take the matter into his owne hand, whose Church, whose religion, whose holy ordinances and most holie name are daily prophaned by them: for as their iniquities are hainous, and their blasphemies against heauen; so doubtlesse their iudgement is gone vp vnto heauen and lifted vp vnto the cloudes.
Foure Treatises Tending to Diswade All Christians from Foure no Less Hainous then Common Sinnes: Namely, the Abuses of Swearing, Drunkennesse, Whoredome, and Briberie.
In March an island would sink beneath the seas because of the "hainous sinnes" of its prince.
(30.) John Downame, Foure Treatises, Tending to Disswade all Christians From Foure no less hainous than common sinnes; namely, the abuses of Swearing, Drunkennesse, Whoredome, and Bribery (London, 1613), 203.