half measure

half measure

n
(often plural) an inadequate measure
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Only no half measures! I will drink to the bottom of the cup or not at all."
There can be no half measures. I must be their leader, or I must vanish from the face of the political world.
'Yes or no, and no half measures!' was the motto which that obdurate person many times repeated; shaking his fist at Mr Boffin, and pegging his motto into the floor with his wooden leg, in a threatening and alarming manner.
"He had gone about 20 hours without sleep and he drank too much, there is no half measure.
"A partial sale of Harold's Cross is a half measure and will not address the debt.
The Emancipation Proclamation was wildly controversial in its time, some arguing that it was an unconstitutional usurpation and others that it was an inadequate half measure. Since then, the Emancipation Proclamation has not been given its due by historians, according to Masur (American studies and history, Rutgers U.), and he has stepped up to the task, providing an engaging and well-researched narrative of its evolution.
It is against this cynicism and the dangers that it poses to democracy and governance that Yeddyurappa's half measure becomes problematic.
President George Bush described Syria's withdrawal as just a 'a half measure
While a bolt can be cross-threaded into place by an inattentive operator, the connector is either connected or not; there is no half measure. If the retaining ring has not been correctly clicked into place, the positional locking cap will not click into place.
From the opening Let It Happen, this was a watery half measure.
Pour a measure each of vodka and gin with a half measure each of whisky and Irish cream liqueur.
Rugby is not a game to be played at half measure or when you are half fit, (carrying an injury).