half-mad

half-mad

adj
1. not entirely sane
2. extremely upset or distracted: half-mad with fear.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
His people, half-mad with excitement and debauch, needed only a cry from him to have closed like magic round these insolent intruders.
Sometimes I think Wolf Larsen mad, or half-mad at least, what of his strange moods and vagaries.
I remember once a young doctor expounding the theory that most catastrophes in family circles, surprising episodes in public affairs and disasters in private life, had their origin in the fact that the world was full of half-mad people.
Byron struggled to live on 130 pounds a year, in Newstead Abbey, near Nottingham, there lived a queer, half-mad, old grand-uncle, who had earned for himself the name of "the wicked lord.
Several times she was quite beside herself and hysterical; and then Jurgis would go half-mad with fright.
Oh, it drives me half-mad to think of it, and I can't sleep a wink at night.
He told that once a half-mad person visited his shop who wanted to write poetry based on love on headstone but has had nothing to pay for it so his desire was not fulfilled.
The chance of rain pouring down on the audience and the front of the stage will add a spectacularly live element to the broadcast, but Lear - in which the half-mad king wanders the moors after giving up his kingdom to his viciously cruel daughters - is famous for its storm scenes.
In the midst of a dark comedy with bloody humor, Joel has to mourn the woman his wife once was--a slightly pathetic, somewhat affecting display of pathos that is both funny and sad, even as Sheila, half-mad with zombie-like hunger, has to try to remember that she has to make sacrifices for the people she loves.
But in those cases where the cosmopolitan position isn't necessarily reasonable or safe, in those instances where the Western elite can go half-mad without realising it, Clinton shows every sign of being just as ready to march into folly as her peers.
Bill Pullman was the US President in 1996, now he's a half-mad codger with a bushy beard.
The scenes where cart-loads of battered metal scrap are brought to Face and his knavish mate, Subtle (another performance to remember from Mark Lockyer, who hurries barefoot and richlycloaked around the stage distilling comfort to the half-mad as he and Face pocket their gold) are delicious, and numismatists will certainly relish the fascinating lines here, showing that Face likes rare coins which, with their regal heads seem to him a version of his own regality, which is nonsense but another example of Jonson's mockery of Jacobean society's self-delusion.