hamantasch

(redirected from hamantaschen)

ha·man·tasch

 (hä′mən-täsh′)
n. pl. ha·man·tasch·en (-tä′shən)
A triangular pastry with a filling such as preserves or poppy seeds, traditionally served in Jewish communities around Purim.

[Yiddish homentash, probably alteration (influenced by post-Biblical Hebrew 'oznê Hāmān, hamantaschen, literally "Haman's ears") of a Yiddish word akin to German Mohntasche, poppy-seed pastry : Mohn, poppy (from Middle High German māhen, from Old High German; akin to Greek mēkōn), Tasche, pocket, pouch (from Middle High German, from Old High German tasca, of unknown origin).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hamantasch

(ˈhɑːmənˌtɑːʃ; ˈhʌmən-)
n
(Cookery) Judaism a pastry, triangular in shape, that contains various types of filling, including prunes and poppy seeds, and is traditionally eaten at the Jewish festival of Purim
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I bring hamantaschen, latkes and kugel to school so my peers can experience my world before they make the decision to blindly hate it.
She was a guest on our show just before Purim in 2017, and brought us the most magical sprinkle hamantaschen. She had just published her memoir/cookbook, Molly on the Range, about her unlikely journey from Juilliard to Brooklyn to a farm on the Minnesota-North Dakota border with her husband, Nick, a fifth-generation sugar beet farmer.
In March, the first daughter uploaded a picture on social media where she and her older kids Arabella, 5, and Joseph, 3, were seen making hamantaschen, a pastry commonly eaten during the Jewish holiday of Purim.
Except for the occasional hamantaschen and bagel, the menu at King Street Cookies is devoted to items that are not associated with Jewish culture, such as the "Spicy Hot Chocolate Cookie" and "George Washington's Revenge," which offers chocolate chunks, toffee, and tart cherries in an oatmeal cookie.
And readers may be starded by his extensive discussion of the resemblance of triangular hamantaschen, knishes and pierogi to a specific feature of the female anatomy.
Recipes include Chocolate and Almond Croissants, Red Velvet Hamantaschen, Lemon and Passion Fruit Pavlova, Cheese Babka, Salted Caramel Banana Tart Tatin, and much more.
Travel Business Review-February 24, 2012--EL AL Israel Airlines Announces Hamantaschen Eating Championship in New York City(C)2012] ENPublishing - http://www.enpublishing.co.uk
Most Americans in urban areas are probably familiar with the special Purim pastries, poppy seed or fruit-filled triangular tarts called hamantaschen, Haman's pockets, made popular by Eastern European Jewish immigrants.
(44) It is here that we see the languages of medicine and natural philosophy in service of the theologically constructed Blood Libel, which claimed that Jews not only required Christian blood for healing charms, amulets, and religious rituals, but also consumed Christian blood mixed with the Passover matzo or in the filling of the Purim Hamantaschen. (45) Jews, it would seem, were biologically driven to consume blood--ironic, of course, because according to Levitical law, the consumption of blood in any form is forbidden.
Julia O'Neil-Welch, program coordinator at the JCC, said preschool children helped to bake three-cornered cookies called hamantaschen, with jelly or poppy-seed filling hidden inside, and will play games like "Pin the Mustache on Haman."
In my novel, the porcelain tickets are bartered for valuable spices to make Purim Hamantaschen; the factory becomes home to Russian Jews living in exile, and Amalie provides temporary employment for Kaya Tucholsky when she's blacklisted for her Communist sympathies.
Hamantaschen, a crunchy sort of cookie pastry shaped like a three-cornered hat, was delish!