hammerbeam


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ham·mer·beam

 (hăm′ər-bēm′)
n.
A short horizontal beam projecting inward at the top of an interior wall, used in opposite pairs instead of a tie beam as a support for arched roof braces.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The nave and its hammerbeam roof is 15th century, although restored, while the chancel and its roof are 19th century.
In the heart of Parliament sits Westminster Hall, the 921-year-old, echoing ancient gathering place and courtroom with a hammerbeam roof and so much history in it you can almost see it ooze from the 6ft-thick walls.
Mr Marsden said the church building had many fine features worth preserving, including stone carvings made by Thomas Earp of London and 'hammerbeam roof' which is a decorative, open timber roof truss which is typical of English Gothic architecture.
On the other side stands the Great Hall, an impressive doubleheight space with large crown-like chandeliers hanging in the cavernous ceiling from the hammerbeam timber roof structure.
Eidlitz, who was primarily responsible for the interior, departed from the historicizing envelope to create a seemingly modern interior (since rebuilt) characterized by a delicate hammerbeam ceiling and galleries cantilevered on iron brackets.
Buchanan Street is also home to the Argyll Arcade with its ornate iron-framed hammerbeam roof.
Architectural highlights include grotesque stone gargoyles and comely female faces carved into pillars of stone, cathedral-like hammerbeam roofs, and stained-glass windows decorating the reading rooms, chapels, and great halls.
Apart from the architectural features, there is a regimental museum, military prison, the Mons Meg (a 500-year-old siege canon), a 12th century chapel, the Great Hall with an unusual hammerbeam roof, the 15th century royal apartments, and outstanding northward views over the gardens and geometric patterned New Town.
Earlier in the day, Yell's trainer, John Hawkes, provided a major upset when his youngster Hammerbeam beat the long-odds-on favourite Murphy's Blu Boy in the Blue Diamond Prelude.
Five stone statues of unnamed Saxon kings look down from alcoves beneath the 12th Century hammerbeam oak roof.
The original plaster-grained ceiling depicting the Knights of the Garter had to be replaced with a new ceiling of oak hammerbeam, the largest of its kind to be built this century.
The quality of the work, from the hammerbeam roof to the stonework is superb.