handbags


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handbags

(ˈhændˌbæɡz)
pl n
facetious an incident in which people, esp sportsmen, fight or threaten to fight, but without real intent to inflict harm (esp in the phrases handbags at dawn, handbags at twenty paces, etc)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
He used to do it with handbags he stole at railway stations, but he's in a monastery now.
So they all got safely to the shore--some swimming, some flying; and those that climbed along the rope brought the Doctor's trunk and handbag with them.
Came into the office carrying a small handbag and asked for a special to London.
She saw him slip a twenty-dollar bill into her handbag with her ticket.
One of the passengers (judging by the handbag that she carried) had not stopped at the village.
The maid took a handbag and the lap dog, the butler and a porter the other baggage.
Obviously he didn't expect to be met, because when I murmured an enquiring, "Senor Ortega?" into his ear he swerved away from me and nearly dropped a little handbag he was carrying.
Then, with a stick in one hand, and the handbag which was his sole luggage in the other, he left the station and turned seaward.
Then my brother's attention was distracted by a bearded, eagle-faced man lugging a small handbag, which split even as my brother's eyes rested on it and disgorged a mass of sovereigns that seemed to break up into separate coins as it struck the ground.
Her father followed carrying a few small objects, a handbag, her handkerchief, a book.
As she appeared before him in the light of the parlour, Mr Verloc observed that she had even her little handbag hanging from her left wrist.
It was a lady's hand-bag which stood upon the study table--a trim little handbag of crocodile-skin and silver.