handkerchief

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hand·ker·chief

 (hăng′kər-chĭf, -chēf′)
n. pl. hand·ker·chiefs also hand·ker·chieves (-chĭvz, -chēvz′)
1. A small square of cloth used especially for wiping the nose or mouth.
2. A large piece of cloth worn as a decorative article; a scarf.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

handkerchief

(ˈhæŋkətʃɪf; -tʃiːf)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a small square of soft absorbent material, such as linen, silk, or soft paper, carried and used to wipe the nose, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hand•ker•chief

(ˈhæŋ kər tʃɪf, -ˌtʃif)

n.
1. a small piece of fabric, usu. square, used for wiping the nose, eyes, etc., or worn as an accessory.
2. a neckerchief or kerchief.
[1520–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.handkerchief - a square piece of cloth used for wiping the eyes or nose or as a costume accessoryhandkerchief - a square piece of cloth used for wiping the eyes or nose or as a costume accessory
bandana, bandanna - large and brightly colored handkerchief; often used as a neckerchief
piece of cloth, piece of material - a separate part consisting of fabric
pocket-handkerchief - a handkerchief that is carried in a pocket
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

handkerchief

noun hanky, tissue (informal), mouchoir, snot rag (slang), nose rag (slang) She blew her nose on her already damp handkerchief.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مِنْدِيلمنديل، محْرَمَه
kapesník
lommetørklæde
nenäliina
maramicarupčić
zsebkendõzsebkendő
vasaklútur
ハンカチ
손수건
nosinė
kabatlakatiņš
vreckovka
robec
näsduk
ผ้าเช็ดหน้า
khăn mùi xoa

handkerchief

[ˈhæŋkətʃɪf] Npañuelo m
see also pocket C
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

handkerchief

[ˈhæŋkərtʃɪf] nmouchoir mhand-knitted [ˌhændˈnɪtɪd] adjtricoté(e) à la main
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

handkerchief

nTaschentuch nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

handkerchief

[ˈhæŋkətʃɪf] nfazzoletto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

handkerchief

(ˈhӕŋkətʃif) plurals ˈhandkerchiefs ~ˈhandkerchieves (-tʃiːvz) noun
(abbreviation hanky) (plural ˈhankies, ~hankie (ˈhaŋki) ) a small usually square piece of cloth or paper tissue used for wiping or blowing one's nose into.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

handkerchief

مِنْدِيل kapesník lommetørklæde Taschentuch μαντήλι pañuelo nenäliina mouchoir rupčić fazzoletto ハンカチ 손수건 zakdoek lommetørkle chusteczka lenço носовой платок näsduk ผ้าเช็ดหน้า mendil khăn mùi xoa 手绢
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
For some United to wear handkerchieves differentiate themselves the The club's board decided that the team would adopt black and white striped shirts, with blue - not black - shorts.
She kept everything for best - candles she'd been given, still wrapped and unburnt, gift sets with her favourite perfumes, pristine folded handkerchieves and gloves, pretty notebooks never written in.
It's a far cry from when the Python's staged their first show at Coventry's Belgrade Theatre back in 1971 and turned up to find men dressed up as "Gumbies" complete with knotted handkerchieves in the front row of the circle.
"People not only urinate, but also spit while they walk around selling socks, handkerchieves, caps, clothes and other things.