harass

(redirected from harassers)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

ha·rass

 (hə-răs′, hăr′əs)
tr.v. ha·rassed, ha·rass·ing, ha·rass·es
1. To subject (another) to hostile or prejudicial remarks or actions; pressure or intimidate.
2. To irritate or torment persistently: His mind was harassed by doubts and misgivings.
3. To make repeated attacks or raids on (an enemy, for example).

[French harasser, from Old French (a la) harache, (a la) harace (as in courre a la harache, to chase) : hare, call used to set dogs on (of Germanic origin; see ko- in Indo-European roots) + -ache, -ace, deprecative n. suff.]

ha·rass′er n.
ha·rass′ment n.
Synonyms: harass, harry, hound, badger, pester, plague
These verbs mean to trouble persistently or incessantly. Harass and harry imply systematic persecution by besieging with repeated annoyances, threats, or demands: The landlord harassed the tenants who were behind in their rent. "John Adams and John Quincy Adams, pillars of personal rectitude, were harried throughout their presidencies by accusations of corruption, fraud, and abuses of power" (Alan Brinkley and Davis Dyer).
Hound suggests unrelenting pursuit to gain a desired end: Reporters hounded the celebrity for an interview. To badger is to nag or entreat persistently: The child badgered his parents for a new bicycle. To pester is to inflict a succession of petty annoyances: "How she would have pursued and pestered me with questions and surmises" (Charlotte Brontë).
Plague refers to a problem likened to a noxious disease: "As I have no estate, I am plagued with no tenants or stewards" (Henry Fielding).
Usage Note: The pronunciation of harass with stress on the first syllable (rhyming roughly with Paris) is the older, traditional pronunciation. The pronunciation with stress on the second syllable (rhyming roughly with surpass) is a newer pronunciation that first occurred in American English. Its use has steadily increased since the mid-1900s. In our 1987 survey, 50 percent of the Usage Panel preferred the pronunciation with stress on the first syllable, and 50 percent preferred stress on the second syllable. Fourteen years later, in our 2001 survey, preference for stress on the first syllable dropped to 30 percent while preference for stress on the second syllable rose to 70 percent. The results from our 2013 survey suggest that this trend away from the traditional pronunciation has continued: only 10 percent preferred the stress on the first syllable, whereas 90 percent preferred the pronunciation with the stress on the second syllable. In fact, in 2013, 35 percent of the Panel considered the pronunciation with the stress on the first syllable to be unacceptable. The original pronunciation has almost completely given way in only a few decades, at least in the United States.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

harass

(ˈhærəs; həˈræs)
vb
(tr) to trouble, torment, or confuse by continual persistent attacks, questions, etc
[C17: from French harasser, variant of Old French harer to set a dog on, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German harēn to cry out]
ˈharassed adj
ˈharassedly adv
haˈrasser n
ˈharassing adj, n
haˈrassingly adv
ˈharassment n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ha•rass

(həˈræs, ˈhær əs)

v.t.
1. to disturb persistently; torment; pester; persecute.
2. to trouble by repeated attacks, incursions, etc., as in war; raid.
[1610–20; < French, Middle French harasser to harry, harass, v. derivative of harace, harache (in phrase courre a la harace pursue) =hare cry used to urge dogs on (< Frankish *hara here, from this side; compare Old High German hera, Middle Dutch hare) + -asse augmentative or pejorative suffix < Latin -ācea]
ha•rass′er, n.
pron: harass, a 17th-century French borrowing, has traditionally been pronounced (ˈhær əs) A newer pronunciation, (həˈræs) which has developed in North American but not British English, is sometimes criticized by older educated speakers. However, it is now the more common pronunciation among younger educated U.S. speakers, some of whom have only minimal familiarity with the older form. See also exquisite.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

harass


Past participle: harassed
Gerund: harassing

Imperative
harass
harass
Present
I harass
you harass
he/she/it harasses
we harass
you harass
they harass
Preterite
I harassed
you harassed
he/she/it harassed
we harassed
you harassed
they harassed
Present Continuous
I am harassing
you are harassing
he/she/it is harassing
we are harassing
you are harassing
they are harassing
Present Perfect
I have harassed
you have harassed
he/she/it has harassed
we have harassed
you have harassed
they have harassed
Past Continuous
I was harassing
you were harassing
he/she/it was harassing
we were harassing
you were harassing
they were harassing
Past Perfect
I had harassed
you had harassed
he/she/it had harassed
we had harassed
you had harassed
they had harassed
Future
I will harass
you will harass
he/she/it will harass
we will harass
you will harass
they will harass
Future Perfect
I will have harassed
you will have harassed
he/she/it will have harassed
we will have harassed
you will have harassed
they will have harassed
Future Continuous
I will be harassing
you will be harassing
he/she/it will be harassing
we will be harassing
you will be harassing
they will be harassing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been harassing
you have been harassing
he/she/it has been harassing
we have been harassing
you have been harassing
they have been harassing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been harassing
you will have been harassing
he/she/it will have been harassing
we will have been harassing
you will have been harassing
they will have been harassing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been harassing
you had been harassing
he/she/it had been harassing
we had been harassing
you had been harassing
they had been harassing
Conditional
I would harass
you would harass
he/she/it would harass
we would harass
you would harass
they would harass
Past Conditional
I would have harassed
you would have harassed
he/she/it would have harassed
we would have harassed
you would have harassed
they would have harassed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.harass - annoy continually or chronicallyharass - annoy continually or chronically; "He is known to harry his staff when he is overworked"; "This man harasses his female co-workers"
needle, goad - goad or provoke,as by constant criticism; "He needled her with his sarcastic remarks"
annoy, devil, gravel, irritate, nark, rile, vex, nettle, rag, bother, chafe, get at, get to - cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations; "Mosquitoes buzzing in my ear really bothers me"; "It irritates me that she never closes the door after she leaves"
bedevil, dun, rag, torment, frustrate, crucify - treat cruelly; "The children tormented the stuttering teacher"
haze - harass by imposing humiliating or painful tasks, as in military institutions
2.harass - exhaust by attacking repeatedly; "harass the enemy"
aggress, attack - take the initiative and go on the offensive; "The Serbs attacked the village at night"; "The visiting team started to attack"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

harass

verb annoy, trouble, bother, worry, harry, disturb, devil (informal), plague, bait, hound, torment, hassle (informal), badger, persecute, exasperate, pester, vex, breathe down someone's neck, chivvy (Brit.), give someone grief (Brit. & S. African), be on your back (slang), beleaguer We are almost routinely harassed by the police.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

harass

verb
1. To trouble persistently from or as if from all sides:
2. To disturb by repeated attacks:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يُضايَقيقوم بِهَجمات مُتَكَرِّرَه على العدو
napadattrápit
angribeforstyrrehærgeplage
gera tíîar skyndiárásirhrjá, angra stöîugt
iškamuotasišvargintasneduoti ramybėspuldinėjimaspuldinėti
nelikt mierānokausēttraucēt
aralıksız saldırılarla taciz etmekrahatsız etmektaciz etmek

harass

[ˈhærəs] VTacosar, hostigar (Mil) → hostilizar, hostigar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

harass

[ˈhærəs həˈræs] vtharceler
to sexually harass sb → harceler qn sexuellement
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

harass

vtbelästigen; (= mess around)schikanieren; (Mil) the enemyAnschläge verüben auf (+acc), → immer wieder überfallen; don’t harass medräng or hetz (inf)mich doch nicht so!; he sexually harassed herer belästigte sie (sexuell); they eventually harassed him into resigningsie setzten ihm so lange zu, bis er schließlich zurücktrat; the landlord was harassing me about the rentder Hauswirt belästigte mich ständig wegen der Miete; a lot of these people are harassed by the policeviele dieser Leute werden ständig von der Polizei schikaniert; a salesman should never seem to harass a potential customerein Vertreter sollte einem potenziellen or potentiellen Kunden gegenüber niemals aufdringlich werden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

harass

[ˈhærəs] vt (attack persistently) → tormentare; (trouble) → assillare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

harass

(ˈhӕrəs) , ((especially American) həˈras) verb
1. to annoy or trouble (a person) constantly or frequently. The children have been harassing me all morning.
2. to make frequent sudden attacks on (an enemy). The army was constantly harassed by groups of terrorists.
ˈharassed adjective
a harassed mother.
ˈharassment noun
He complained of harassment by the police.
sexual harassmentsex
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

harass

v. acosar, perturbar, hostigar, hostilizar.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Again, the nuances vary, with Franke emphasizing the reflexive construction of both harassers and victims around normative gender roles, (110) while Schultz stresses the material implications of establishing an idealized masculine personae that can be mobilized to exclude women, youth, and effeminate men from economically and socially prized forms of work.
The women carried banners with messages denouncing harassers as harassment has become all too common in Egypt, especially in the protests that have been happening in the iconic Tahrir Squares and other places.
Don't allow fat cat politicians and persons in authority to blame us for the disgusting behaviour of harassers. Join local action where it exists.
Instead, it appears that the harassers' intent was to invoke power and intimidate the victims.
Surprising her harassers, she stripped bare and then, cash in hand, got dressed again, but was still questioned about the incident by police.
We wish them well and admire them in their battle to rid their streets of the hatemongers, harassers and hoods - and pray their quest is short and successful.
Based on how often they reported engaging in any type of Internet harassment, the respondents were classified as "limited" (one to two times), "occasional" (three to five times), or "frequent" (six or more times) harassers.
After she complained, company representatives met with the employee, posted notices explaining their harassment policy, interviewed the alleged harassers, inspected the grounds for graffiti, and included harassment training in all safety training programs.
Out of touch with workplace social reality, the court's views are structured out of presumption and stereotypes which lead to a focus on the behaviour of the female victims of workplace sexual harassment instead of the behaviour of the harasser. The outcome is that victims win too few cases, and harassers and their employers win too many.
Realizing her harassers thought she had a gay pride flag, Wells, 46, ordered 100 pace flags to distribute in her community.
Second, perceptions of sexual harassment are studied using scenarios that include male and female victims as well as male and female harassers to acknowledge possible homosexual harassment as well as the possibility of women harassers.
A comprehensive discussion shows how sexual harassment affects recipients, harassers, coworkers, and management, clearly demonstrating that it has consequences for everyone in the workplace.