harbor defense


Also found in: Acronyms.

harbor defense

The defense of a harbor or anchorage and its water approaches against external threats such as: a. submarine, submarine-borne, or small surface craft attack; b. enemy minelaying operations; and c. sabotage. The defense of a harbor from guided missiles while such missiles are airborne is considered to be a part of air defense. See also port security.
References in classic literature ?
There's the Hydra, a harbor defense turret-ship, but she never leaves the home waters.
Defendant Flea World was misguided in claiming the ISP safe harbor defense and the court so agreed as the defense was struck down.
Congress authorized the Army to build or strengthen fixed harbor defenses and the Navy to build blue-water ships to defend America's right to the sea lanes.
The court ruled that a third contract under which the gasoline was supplied was not a forward contract and was not subject to the safe harbor defense to preference claims.
CDR Tera Salo, Harbor Defense and Port Security Plans Officer for CNFK, said the myriad tasks that CNFK supply personnel performed made the exercise possible.
PH1 Sonya Moore documents ships departing Norfolk Naval Station to assist with harbor defense after the attacks of September 11th.
Other units in the exercise included the Coast Guard's Harbor Defense Command Unit 111, Alameda, Calif.
Sabeus supplies military surveillance products including embedded perimeter security systems, fiber optic sub-systems for towed & hull-mounted applications, and ocean bottom cable arrays for harbor defense and littoral surveillance.
Seahawk's prime goal revolves around the development of a standard operating procedure for harbor defense when more than one country or element is involved.
Sabeus is a licensed government contractor and supplies military surveillance products including embedded perimeter security and intrusion detection systems, fiber optic array sub-systems for towed or hull-mounted applications and ocean bottom cable arrays for harbor defense and other littoral surveillance applications.
One of his undercover sources, Charles Slocombe, wormed his way into the confidence of German agents overseen by a spymaster known as Count Ernst Ulrich von Bulow, who asked about minefields and harbor defenses.