hard maple


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Related to hard maple: sugar maple, Soft Maple

hard maple

n.
The hard, heavy wood of any of several maples, especially a sugar maple.

sug′ar ma`ple


n.
any of several maples having a sweet sap, esp. Acer saccharum, yielding a valuable hard wood and being the chief source of maple syrup and maple sugar.
[1725–35, Amer.]
sug′ar-ma`ple, adj.
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The objectives of this study were to quantify, order, and determine the respective importance of drying schedule, harvest season, and log age on the color of kiln-dried hard maple boards.
Species: Red & white oak, poplar, beech, hickory, ash, hard maple, cherry, mahogany, teak, cedar
Discoloration of hard maple lumber commonly occurs during kiln-drying.
sample doors, a complete set of all 91 standard finishes and a sale kit (shown) that features prefinished sample doors; a panel profile and miter rail board; color chain of oak, cherry, hard maple and glazed samples; a refacing product sample chain with veneer and solid wood samples, plus brochures and a specification guide.
Wood species used were flat-sliced red oak and hard maple cut on a half-round machine.
continues its success in the wood-based business, offering a variety of dimension components, with high quality hard maple squares and dowels at the heart of its product offerings.
As late as the early 1970s, soft maple lumber was similar in price to red oak, white oak, and hard maple, and not far below cherry.
The 100-by-200-foot hard maple floor is the largest roller-skating rink in the area, says Mark Basich, Orbits general manager.
The best maple syrup comes from sugar maple or hard maple trees, because their sap has the highest sugar content.
2 cords more or less of pulpwood; hard maple, black cherry, red maple, hemlock, white ash, yellow birch, norway spruce, basswood, aspen, beech, red oak; located on approximately 111 acres.
stellate]); hard maple (primarily sugar maple [Acer saccharum]); soft maple (primarily red maple [A.
According to Andy Johnson, Hardwood Publishing, early preferences from mill owners calls for more ash, aspen and cypress, and less red oak and hard maple.