hard power


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hard power

n
the ability to achieve one's goals by force, esp military force. Compare soft power
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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While the first decades of MLB as a business were owner-dominated and stable, the overreliance on hard power actually caused the league to stagnate and hindered development.
Known for being top quality and their remarkable performance and innovative designs, A-DATA portable hard disk drives have more than "hard power" to offer, notably the most valuable software.
As the second largest country in the world geographically, Canada has huge potentials in all sectors ranging from agriculture to education and from cultural soft power to technological hard power. Such a suitable environment has provided enough ground for many Iranians in reaching their dreams into fruition.
While for the past eight years the Bush administration's foreign policy has used only hard power, inter-regional diplomacy has evolved.
This advice leans on the use of soft power, but hard power should also come into play with respect to systematic measures of performance, evaluation of the impact of the approaches, and interventions of an agency or network on the intended mission or desired outcome.
Because of its enormous hard power capabilities, US policy-makers have been conscious of the fact that the United States potentially can, if it chooses, significantly influence its external environment.
Democrats have been losing elections for the past five years and if you want to understand just why, HARD POWER is the place to go.
Whereas hard power remains relatively concentrated (with annual U.S.
Exponents of "hard power" tend to dismiss this as of little consequence--"let them hate us so long as they fear us." However, writing as a British official who used to slipstream behind his American big brother during the Cold War and drew upon the undoubted moral authority enjoyed by the United States in those days, I can assure readers that Walt's analysis is spot on.
For him it is a matter of balancing power and persuasion, hard power and soft power (and, presumably, hard persuasion and soft persuasion), to support U.S.
In a meeting with Yamasaki, Teo criticized the United States for its reliance on ''hard power'' over Iraq, Yamasaki told reporters afterward.