hard-headed

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hard-headed

adj
1. tough, realistic, or shrewd; not moved by sentiment
2. US and Canadian stubborn; obstinate
ˌhard-ˈheadedly adv
ˌhard-ˈheadedness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

hard-headed

adjective shrewd, tough, practical, cool, sensible, realistic, pragmatic, astute, hard-boiled (informal), hard-bitten, level-headed, unsentimental, badass (slang, chiefly U.S.) a hard-headed and shrewd businesswoman
sentimental, unrealistic, idealistic, impractical
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

hard-headed

[ˈhɑːdˈhedɪd] ADJ (= shrewd) → realista, práctico; (= stubborn) → terco
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hard-headed

[ˌhɑːdˈhɛdɪd] adjpratico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

hard

(haːd) adjective
1. firm; solid; not easy to break, scratch etc. The ground is too hard to dig.
2. not easy to do, learn, solve etc. Is English a hard language to learn?; He is a hard man to please.
3. not feeling or showing kindness. a hard master.
4. (of weather) severe. a hard winter.
5. having or causing suffering. a hard life; hard times.
6. (of water) containing many chemical salts and so not easily forming bubbles when soap is added. The water is hard in this part of the country.
adverb
1. with great effort. He works very hard; Think hard.
2. with great force; heavily. Don't hit him too hard; It was raining hard.
3. with great attention. He stared hard at the man.
4. to the full extent; completely. The car turned hard right.
ˈharden verb
to make or become hard. Don't touch the toffee till it hardens; Try not to harden your heart against him.
ˈhardness noun
ˈhardship noun
(something which causes) pain, suffering etc. a life full of hardship.
ˈhard-and-fast adjective
(of rules) that can never be changed or ignored.
ˈhard-back noun
a book with a hard cover. Hard-backs are more expensive than paperbacks.
ˌhard-ˈboiled adjective
(of eggs) boiled until the white and the yolk are solid.
hardˈdisk noun
a device that is fixed inside a computer and is used for storing information.
ˈhard-earned adjective
earned by hard work or with difficulty. I deserve every penny of my hard-earned wages.
ˌhard-ˈheaded adjective
practical; shrewd; not influenced by emotion. a hard-headed businessman.
ˌhard-ˈhearted adjective
not feeling or showing pity or kindness. a hard-hearted employer.
ˈhardware noun
1. metal goods such as pots, tools etc. This shop sells hardware.
2. the mechanical parts of a computer.
ˌhard-ˈwearing adjective
that will not wear out easily. a hard-wearing fabric.
be hard on
1. to punish or criticize severely. Don't be too hard on the boy – he's too young to know that he was doing wrong.
2. to be unfair to. If you punish all the children for the broken window it's a bit hard on those who had nothing to do with it.
hard at it
busy doing (something). I've been hard at it all day, trying to get this report finished.
hard done by
unfairly treated. You should complain to the headmaster if you feel hard done by.
hard lines/luck
bad luck. Hard lines/luck! I'm afraid you haven't won this time; It's hard luck that he broke his leg.
hard of hearing
rather deaf. He is a bit hard of hearing now.
a hard time (of it)
trouble, difficulty, worry etc. The audience gave the speaker a hard time of it at the meeting; The speaker had a hard time (of it) trying to make himself heard.
hard up
not having much especially money. I'm a bit hard up at the moment; I'm hard up for envelopes.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like everyone else, I'd heard the rumors about pointer hard-headedness, but the English pointers I've trained and been around have all been happy and eager to please.
There's a familiar dictum which goes: "To see is to believe." This "show-me-first" attitude can imply a practical hard-headedness or lack of trust in another.
In a country of myths and legends, of folk hero fly-halves and daring wingers, Gatland has attained immortality by harnessing the latent emotional force of Welsh rugby and adding tactical shrewdness and hard-headedness.
Last year, she took a swipe at her daughter's supposed hard-headedness in a series of posts on Twitter.
Macedonian nationalism, Albanian hard-headedness, anemic government and indecisive prime minister can bring down the Government because of the Law for scratching tongue.
However, this should be met not by further hard-headedness and heavy-handedness by an emboldened Baghdad, but by a willingness to negotiate with the Kurds in good faith over remaining issues of contention, and to show flexibility and pragmatism in the process.
But such hard-headedness about evidence--to paraphrase Steve Fuller--masks a naivete about causation.
"I wouldn't change a thing, though - it has given me my opinions and my hard-headedness."
Stephenson balances remorseless hard-headedness with unflagging ingenuity....
"In order to get it done, we've got to have the same determination, the same focus, the same hard-headedness, the same passion that that family I saw in Las Vegas today has."
In a community where heavy eating and chain smoking are a way of life, where poverty, hard-headedness and even suspicion hinder access to basic health care, residents die at an average age of 73 - seven years earlier than the longest-living Texans, according to a preliminary county-by-county analysis by the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.