hard news

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hard news

n.
News or investigative journalism that deals with serious topics and events.

hard′-news′, hard′news′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hard news - news that deals with serious topics or events
news - information reported in a newspaper or news magazine; "the news of my death was greatly exaggerated"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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sharing, but has since tried to boost its hard-news credentials.
Through critical discourse analysis (CDA), the study yields insightful analysis of hard-news text.
In addition to NBC's initiative with "Rock Center," CBS News has embraced a hard-news approach under new chairman Jeff Fager and evening-news anchor Scott Pelley.
* BREAKING: August Fridays are really slow hard-news days.
What explains the success of hard-news letters, such as Kane's Beverage Week, the various Institutional Investor letters and Communications Daily?
CBS covered Afghanistan most heavily yet its hard-news reputation was undermined by a decision to treat pop singer Michael Jackson's untimely death as a major story.
In an introductory essay, Jones describes his career path, from his early days as a college student to work as an AP hard-news photographer and the transition into his current role as a celebrity portrait photographer.
That best story is not necessarily the most important hard-news story in the grand scheme of things, he added.
"But I'm more of a hard-news kind of gal as it were and, while I really enjoyed filling in, hard news is what I really wanted so I was delighted when the opportunity came up to become news anchor.
In his move away from fact-based, neutral, impersonal hard-news stories, Gans suggests that journalism needs to focus much more on understanding what leads to, and follows from, events and conditions.
This, he said, was the result of a "post-Watergate 'gotcha' type of journalism" exemplified by "the reassignment of soft news to hard-news reporters as soon as it hits the front page." Assigning hard-news reporters to stories about the arts, he said, emphasized contentiousness and eliminated subtlety.
Hard-news footage combined with some lighter moments and a few songs of the day thrown in make it great viewing.