hardy

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har·dy 1

 (här′dē)
adj. har·di·er, har·di·est
1. Able to withstand difficult or adverse conditions; robust: hardy explorers; hardy perennials.
2.
a. Courageous; intrepid.
b. Archaic Brazenly daring; audacious.

[Middle English, from Old French hardi, past participle of hardir, make hard, embolden, of Germanic origin; see kar- in Indo-European roots.]

har′di·ly adv.
har′di·ness n.

click for a larger image
hardy2
left to right: cold-cutting and hot-cutting hardy chisel heads

har·dy 2

 (här′dē)
n. pl. har·dies
A square-shanked chisel that fits into a square hole in an anvil.

[Probably from hard.]

hardy

(ˈhɑːdɪ)
adj, -dier or -diest
1. having or demanding a tough constitution; robust
2. bold; courageous
3. foolhardy; rash
4. (Botany) (of plants) able to live out of doors throughout the winter
[C13: from Old French hardi bold, past participle of hardir to become bold, of Germanic origin; compare Old English hierdan to harden1, Old Norse hertha, Old High German herten]

hardy

(ˈhɑːdɪ)
n, pl -dies
(Tools) any blacksmith's tool made with a square shank so that it can be lodged in a square hole in an anvil
[C19: probably from hard]

Hardy

(ˈhɑːdɪ)
n
1. (Biography) Oliver. See Laurel and Hardy
2. (Biography) Thomas. 1840–1928, British novelist and poet. Most of his novels are set in his native Dorset (part of his fictional Wessex) and include Far from the Madding Crowd (1874), The Return of the Native (1878), The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886), Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1891), and Jude the Obscure (1895), after which his work consisted chiefly of verse
3. (Biography) Sir Thomas Masterman. 1769–1839, British naval officer, flag captain under Nelson (1799–1805): 1st Sea Lord (1830)

har•dy

(ˈhɑr di)

adj. -di•er, -di•est.
1. sturdy; strong: a hardy constitution.
2. (of plants) able to withstand the cold of winter in the open air.
3. requiring great physical courage, vigor, or endurance: hardy sports.
4. courageous: hardy explorers.
5. unduly bold; presumptuous; foolhardy.
[1175–1225; Middle English hardi < Old French, past participle of *hardir to harden, make brave < Germanic; compare Old High German hartjan to harden, Gothic -hardjan]
har′di•ness, n.

Har•dy

(ˈhɑr di)

n.
1. Oliver, 1892–1957, U.S. motion-picture comedian.
2. Thomas, 1840–1928, English novelist and poet.

Hardy

A heavy chisel designed to fit upright in the hardy-hole of an anvil.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hardy - United States slapstick comedian who played the pompous and overbearing member of the Laurel and Hardy duo who made many films (1892-1957)Hardy - United States slapstick comedian who played the pompous and overbearing member of the Laurel and Hardy duo who made many films (1892-1957)
Laurel and Hardy - United States slapstick comedy duo who made many films together
2.hardy - English novelist and poet (1840-1928)Hardy - English novelist and poet (1840-1928)
Adj.1.hardy - having rugged physical strength; inured to fatigue or hardships; "hardy explorers of northern Canada"; "proud of her tall stalwart son"; "stout seamen"; "sturdy young athletes"
robust - sturdy and strong in form, constitution, or construction; "a robust body"; "a robust perennial"
2.hardy - able to survive under unfavorable weather conditions; "strawberries are hardy and easy to grow"; "camels are tough and hardy creatures"
robust - sturdy and strong in form, constitution, or construction; "a robust body"; "a robust perennial"
3.hardy - invulnerable to fear or intimidationhardy - invulnerable to fear or intimidation; "audacious explorers"; "fearless reporters and photographers"; "intrepid pioneers"
bold - fearless and daring; "bold settlers on some foreign shore"; "a bold speech"; "a bold adventure"

hardy

adjective
1. strong, tough, robust, sound, fit, healthy, vigorous, rugged, sturdy, hale, stout, stalwart, hearty, lusty, in fine fettle They grew up to be farmers, round-faced and hardy.
strong soft, weak, delicate, fragile, frail, feeble, sickly, weedy
2. courageous, brave, daring, bold, heroic, manly, gritty, feisty (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), resolute, intrepid, valiant, plucky, valorous, stouthearted A few hardy souls leapt into the encircling seas.
courageous soft, weak, feeble, weedy (informal), faint-hearted, wussy (slang), wimpish or wimpy (informal)

hardy

adjective
1. Physically toughened so as to have great endurance:
2. Capable of exerting considerable effort or of withstanding considerable stress or hardship:
Translations
جَريء ، شُجاع
otužilý
hårdfør
harîger, harîur
ištvermingumas
izturīgsnorūdīts
otužilý

hardy

[ˈhɑːdɪ] ADJ (hardier (compar) (hardiest (superl))) → fuerte, robusto (Bot) → resistente

hardy

[ˈhɑːrdi] adj
[person, animal] → robuste
[plant] → résistant(e) au gel

hardy

adj (+er)
(= tough, robust) person, animalrobust, zäh; (= hardened)abgehärtet; (Bot) plantwinterhart
(= bold) personunerschrocken

hardy

[ˈhɑːdɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → forte, robusto/a (Bot) → resistente al gelo

hardy

(ˈhaːdi) adjective
tough; strong; able to bear cold, tiredness etc. This plant is very hardy and able to survive even rough winter weather.
ˈhardiness noun
References in classic literature ?
What other hardier pioneer would come, hatchet in hand, to cut down the dark copses?
In the morning he had a spin in the ice-boat with his hostess and a few of the hardier guests; in the afternoon he "went over the farm" with Reggie, and listened, in the elaborately appointed stables, to long and impressive disquisitions on the horse; after tea he talked in a corner of the firelit hall with a young lady who had professed herself broken-hearted when his engagement was announced, but was now eager to tell him of her own matrimonial hopes; and finally, about midnight, he assisted in putting a gold-fish in one visitor's bed, dressed up a burglar in the bath-room of a nervous aunt, and saw in the small hours by joining in a pillow-fight that ranged from the nurseries to the basement.
The tropical verdure of the lowlands was replaced by hardier vegetation, but even here the effects of constant heat and light were apparent in the immensity of the trees and the profusion of foliage and blooms.
Yet he adds, "They are not hardier than other people.
The trees, the flowers and the shrubs were of a hardier type, and I realized that at night the Galu blanket might be almost a necessity.
Firmness, activity, and enterprise, covered with grave foliage, poetic feeling and fervour; but these flowers were still there, preserved pure and dewy under the umbrage of later growth and hardier nature: perhaps I only in the world knew the secret of their existence, but to me they were ever ready to yield an exquisite fragrance and present a beauty as chaste as radiant.
If verified by future work, however, both findings suggest that life in the solar system is hardier, and perhaps more widespread, than we have long believed.
The Rolling Stones may be one of rock 'n' roll's hardiest bands, but their Russian fans - who've waited 31 years to hear them perform in Moscow - are hardier.
If hardier cancer cells survive, "you could eventually produce bigger and better tumors," he says.
And growers' attempts to cross strains of plants to produce hardier, larger, earlier-maturing or different-colored produce can contribute to random mutations, he said.
Adding several resistance genes into one plant, he believes, may yield hardier crops that can fend off a much wider variety of pathogens.
Sow vegetables for early winter use such as salad onion White Lisbon Winter Bunching, carrot Amsterdam Forcing, lettuce Little Gem - for leaves to be cut in late autumn - and a hardier lettuce, Winter Density, for overwintering and spring cropping.