hardy perennial

Translations

hardy perennial

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Adam walked round by the rick-yard, at present empty of ricks, to the little wooden gate leading into the garden--once the well- tended kitchen-garden of a manor-house; now, but for the handsome brick wall with stone coping that ran along one side of it, a true farmhouse garden, with hardy perennial flowers, unpruned fruit- trees, and kitchen vegetables growing together in careless, half- neglected abundance.
HASN'T Judy Murray got anything better to tweet about than that hardy perennial about retailers in London not taking Scottish banknotes?
You can purchase this hardy perennial as a 1ltr pot plant.
You can purchase this hardy perennial as a one-litre pot plant.
Yarrow is a native plant, that as you've found out, is easy to care for and is a hardy perennial. Yarrow looks delicate with its small flowers and leaves, but it's one tough cookie!
HYDRANGEA proved a hardy perennial to give Aidan O'Brien (below) a share of racing history with a strong-staying victory in the Group 1 British Champions Fillies' & Mares' Stakes.
Next, up we come to my hardy perennial, packaging and packaging waste.
The annual competition is now becoming a hardy perennial in the North East social calendar, a reminder of seaside fun from generations gone by.
This hardy perennial likes both the sun and a bit of shade.
This sun-loving, hardy perennial grows from Manitoba to Texas, thriving down to Zone 3 and growing grander each year.
If news items were flowers, the Ten Commandments would be a hardy perennial, coming up with reassuring regularity.
This article by an assistant professor at the University of Paris, Dauphine, examines that hardy perennial, "Why can't companies kill projects that are clearly doomed?" Or, as Research Management put it 22 years ago, "When do you admit this horse is really dead?" From her analysis of two failed innovations at two large French companies (a corrective lens at Essilor and an industrial additive at Lafarge), Royer concludes that rather than managerial incompetence or the bureaucracy, blame rests on "a fervent and widespread belief among managers in the inevitability of their projects' ultimate success." To avoid such an outcome, she recommends assembling project teams not entirely composed of like-minded people and putting in place--and sticking to--well-defined review processes.