harm's way


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harm's way

(härmz)
n.
A risky position; danger: a place for the children that is out of harm's way; ships that sail into harm's way.
References in classic literature ?
Then we'll send Amy off to Aunt March's for a spell, to keep her out of harm's way, and one of you girls can stay at home and amuse Beth for a day or two.
By passing the proposed ban on using corporal punishment with children under 3 years of age, our state's elected officials would let those parents who still use corporal punishment know that there are better ways to gain the cooperation and respect of children, as well as better ways of keeping children out of harm's way.
She personifies what all of us hold dear in this profession of arms and she is the representation of American Airmen today out there in harm's way doing what we do best.
ITEM: The March 29 New York Times reported: "In recent months, there has been an eruption of illegal immigration and related violence in Arizona, and with it has come a realization by federal officials: no matter how many hundreds of thousands of migrants they catch and send back over the border, many will return time and again unless the government finds better ways to keep them out of the country and out of harm's way.
Unfortunately, there are signs in some of the financial markets that a number of schools may be putting themselves in harm's way by using this practice," notes Lamkin.
They offer expanding opportunities for new and unique capabilities, for persistence and digital acuity, and they offer an invaluable advantage--the ability to perform needed missions without putting our warfighters into harm's way.
In those cases, residents often refuse to testify because they don't want to put themselves in harm's way.
Storm-chasers driving alongside tornadoes: ``The regular and intelligent spotters would never put themselves in harm's way like they did in the movie.