harmdoing

harmdoing

(ˈhɑːmˌduːɪŋ)
n
the doing of harm
References in periodicals archive ?
113, 119 n.15 (1996) (noting that it is not clear why preventive detention of a defendant "is more justifiable than for any other person posing an equal risk of similar harmdoing").
Cyberbullying is often defined in reference to Olweus' (1993) traditional elements of bullying, which he "characterized by three criteria: (1) it is aggressive behavior and intentional "harmdoing" (2) it is carried out repeatedly and over time (3) it is an interpersonal relationship characterized by an imbalance of power" (p.
To bring indirect violence to life, Dickens uses virtually every component of the novel form, including structure, language, plot, characterization, and thematics, first to connect individual acts of harmdoing that resemble Zizek's symbolic or linguistic violence to larger structures of authority so that their systemic nature stands revealed, and then to link both the actions and their authorizing structures to violent effects that are subjective, immediate, and corporeal.
Counselors may ask questions such as "Did you strongly resist your conscience in order to do the behavior?" or "Did you experience excitement or pleasure while committing the harmdoing?" or "Are you remorseful?"
that involve purposeless or irreparable harmdoing of an extraordinarily
Olweus (1999) conceptualizes bullying as being characterized by three criteria: "(1) It is aggressive behavior or intentional harmdoing (2) which is carried out repeatedly and over time (3) in an interpersonal relationship characterized by an imbalance of power" (p.
Professor Stephen Morse has opined that "[i]n the case of seriously crazy people, whose irrational practical reasoning leads to the intent to do harm, ameliorating the crazy thinking through proper medication should in fact reduce the risk of harmdoing." (43) If Morse's postulation is accurate, then what accounts for the recidivism of insanity acquittees after they have been released from the hospital and their sanity presumably has been restored?
Purely accidental, non-negligent harmdoing, for example, may be the product of intentional movements performed by an entirely rational agent, but the criminal law would not blame or punish such harmdoing because the agent has done no wrong, has violated no reasonable expectation of taking care.
Moreover, the justice of holding people to high standards of regard for, the rights and interests of others is especially warranted in cases involving serious harmdoing, because such situations give agents the strongest possible reasons to avoid breaching moral expectations.
The crime is complete when the agent recklessly fails to take the steps reasonably necessary to avoid harmdoing. The term of imprisonment should be relatively short, but at the end of each term, a still-dangerous convict would be exposed to criminal liability again unless he or she took the appropriate steps.
"Individual and Societal (Group) Values in a Motivational Perspective and their Role in Benevolence and Harmdoing." In Social and Moral Values: Individual and Societal Perspectives.