harmolodics


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harmolodics

(ˌhɑːməˈlɒdɪks)
n
(Jazz) (functioning as singular) jazz the technique of each musician in a group simultaneously improvising around the melodic and rhythmic patterns in a tune, rather than one musician improvising on its underlying harmonic pattern while the others play an accompaniment
[C20: of unknown origin]
ˌharmoˈlodic adj
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These hot, ultra-smart insurgents make music drawing on John Coltrane's sheets of sound, James Blood Ulmer's harmolodics, and death metal blitzkrieg.
Coleman also created a musical system called Harmolodics in which he applied orchestral techniques to albums like Skies Of America and Science Fiction at the start of the 70s.
His first solo album in three years focuses less on the outre harmolodics of the Coleman school than it does on funk and the blues; working with such esteemed sidepersons as keyboardists Amina Claudine Myers and Bernie Worrell, drummer Jerome "Bigfoot" Brailey, and bassist Bill Laswell, Ulmer cooks up a thick and spicy stew of funky mid-tempo beats, bluesy guitar solos and spiritual, sometimes mystical, spoken-word pronouncements.
It's conversation that this godfather of the postwar jazz avant-garde is after, an exchange of ideas that parallels the internal flow of musical ideas in his self-developed form, which he calls harmolodics.
For sixty years, Ornette Coleman has been making waves in life and in music with his idea of harmolodics. For him, life and art are not separate.
Coleman: "I want to make harmolodics available to everyone, not just people playing tempered instruments.
When the ensemble sections kick in, with their almost diaphanous dissonances out of Ravel, they paradoxically come closer to realizing Coleman's goal of bringing harmolodics to classical music.
It's the central idea behind harmolodics, a declaration of the primacy of the improviser over composition, a lesson about the fortuitous but hard-working nature of maintaining individual freedom within any group structure.
Harmolodics is what Coleman calls his kaleidoscopically hybridized idiom: the collapse of harmony, melody and time in a kind of post-Einsteinian universe.
Even Dixieland, although it's similar to harmolodics, still deals with one solo at a time, because it's using the same device [the chord sequence] to play the way they're playing.
While Ornette, for instance, would fold funky rhythms into his own harmolodic concept, White did James Brown tunes like "Cold Sweat" and "I Got the Feelin'" as well as original material, all spiked with nerve-jangling verbal assaults and solos.