harmonist

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har·mo·nist

 (här′mə-nĭst)
n.
One skilled in harmony.

har′mo·nis′tic adj.
har′mo·nis′ti·cal·ly adv.

harmonist

(ˈhɑːmənɪst)
n
1. (Music, other) a person skilled in the art and techniques of harmony
2. (Bible) a person who combines and collates parallel narratives
ˌharmoˈnistic adj
ˌharmoˈnistically adv

Harmonist

a member of a Protestant sect from Württemberg, Germany that settled in Harmony, Pennsylvania, in 1803, and believed in common ownership of property.
See also: Protestantism
a person skilled in the principles of harmony. See also literature
See also: Music
a scholar of literature who shows parallels or harmony between passages from different authors. See also music.
See also: Literature
References in classic literature ?
And he who mingles music with gymnastic in the fairest proportions, and best attempers them to the soul, may be rightly called the true musician and harmonist in a far higher sense than the tuner of the strings.
As a verbal melodist, especially a melodist of sweetness and of stately grace, and as a harmonist of prolonged and complex cadences, he is unsurpassable.
Heavy metal group Def Leppard, pop experimentalists Roxy Music and English psychedelic rock harmonists The Zombies rounded out the five-strong class of British inductees.The inclusion of Jackson and whose socially conscious, sexually provocative and eminently danceable tracks made her a household name in the 1980s and comes as the Hall of Fame increasingly expands its definition of rock to include the likes of RandB.
The situation was complicated further by the Separatists' relationship with the Harmonists, also a German Pietist group from Wurttemberg with similar beliefs, who were living at this time in southern Indiana.
As a metic in America, I have always found something compelling about the way in which certain forms of quotidian being-together have been possible out of the reach and under the radar of the federal state, and the way in which the energy that binds such groups together finds its source in religion or quasi-religious orders--from the Harmonists in the nineteenth century to more recent weird outgrowths like the Branch Davidians and countless other groups.
To expand his ideas on social reform, Robert Owen purchased the town of New Harmony, Indiana from the Harmonists in 1824 to establish a Utopian society of artists, scientists, and social reformers (Carmony & Elliott 1980).
Festival Mythos, in 19 performances on various stages within the newly restored Konzerthaus in former East Berlin, offered symphonic works, silent films, nightclub cabaret, swing bands, mini-operas, a saxophone quartet, hurdy-gurdys, the premiere of a commissioned orchestral work and a tribute to the famous Comedian Harmonists. It was an exhilarating ride of discovery and delight into a creative and turbulent decade.
Resuming once more, he bounded - literally at times - through a quick-fire set-list that included performances by German vocal ensemble, the Berlin Comedian Harmonists, and rising opera star Mirusia Louwerse, who sang Wishing You Were Somewhere Here Again from Phantom of the Opera.
Resuming once more, he bounded -- literally at times -- through a quick-fire set-list that included performances by German vocal ensemble, the Berlin Comedian Harmonists, and rising opera star Mirusia Louwerse, who sang Wishing You Were Somewhere Here Again from Phantom of the Opera.
"The Berlin Comedian Harmonists will join us and we have lots of international soloists.
Building on the success of New Lanark, Owen then conceived an even greater ambition to establish a utopian community in the United States, and he purchased land in Indiana from a separatist religious group - the Harmonists - already settled there.