harpsichord


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harp·si·chord

 (härp′sĭ-kôrd′)
n.
A keyboard instrument whose strings are plucked by means of quills or plectrums.

[Alteration of obsolete French harpechorde, from Italian arpicordo : arpa, harp (from Late Latin harpa, of Germanic origin) + corda, string (from Latin chorda, from Greek khordē; see gherə- in Indo-European roots).]

harp′si·chord′ist n.

harpsichord

(ˈhɑːpsɪˌkɔːd)
n
(Instruments) a horizontally strung stringed keyboard instrument, triangular in shape, consisting usually of two manuals controlling various sets of strings plucked by pivoted plectrums mounted on jacks. Some harpsichords have a pedal keyboard and stops by which the tone colour may be varied
[C17: from New Latin harpichordium, from Late Latin harpa harp + Latin chorda chord1]
ˈharpsiˌchordist n

harp•si•chord

(ˈhɑrp sɪˌkɔrd)

n.
a keyboard instrument, precursor of the piano, in which the strings are plucked by leather or quill points connected with the keys, in common use from the 16th to the 18th century, and revived in the 20th.
[1605–15; < New Latin harpichordium (with intrusive -s-). See harp, -i-, chord1]
harp′si•chord`ist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.harpsichord - a clavier with strings that are plucked by plectra mounted on pivotsharpsichord - a clavier with strings that are plucked by plectra mounted on pivots
Klavier, clavier - a stringed instrument that has a keyboard
spinet - early model harpsichord with only one string per note
pair of virginals, virginal - a legless rectangular harpsichord; played (usually by women) in the 16th and 17th centuries
Translations
مِعْزَف قيثاري
cembalo
cembalo
csembaló
semball
klavesinas
klavihords
čembalo
čembalo
cembalo
çimbaloklâvsen

harpsichord

[ˈhɑːpsɪkɔːd] Nclavicémbalo m, clavecín m

harpsichord

[ˈhɑːrpsikɔːrd] nclavecin m

harpsichord

nCembalo nt

harpsichord

[ˈhɑːpsɪˌkɔːd] nclavicembalo, cembalo

harpsichord

(ˈhaːpsikoːd) noun
a type of early keyboard musical instrument.
References in classic literature ?
I should hear it still rippling on with its gentle harpsichord tinkle, as I stretched myself down among the cool lavendered sheets, and little by little let slip the multifarious world.
26, you can think of me, and how I used to lie awake, listening to the stream rippling beneath the window, with its gentle harpsichord tinkle, and little by little letting slip the multifarious world.
It was strewn about with a few old books, and a work-basket, and a dusty writing-desk; and had, on one side, a large black article of furniture, of very strange appearance, which the old gentlewoman told Phoebe was a harpsichord.
To find the born and educated lady, on the other hand, we need look no farther than Hepzibah, our forlorn old maid, in her rustling and rusty silks, with her deeply cherished and ridiculous consciousness of long descent, her shadowy claims to princely territory, and, in the way of accomplishment, her recollections, it may be, of having formerly thrummed on a harpsichord, and walked a minuet, and worked an antique tapestry-stitch on her sampler.
But, even now, she was supposed to haunt the House of the Seven Gables, and, a great many times, --especially when one of the Pyncheons was to die,--she had been heard playing sadly and beautifully on the harpsichord.
He says there is only an old harpsichord at Lowick, and it is covered with books.
I could not so readily come at playing on the harpsichord or spinet, because I had no instrument of my own to practice on, and could only come at theirs in the intervals when they left it, which was uncertain; but yet I learned tolerably well too, and the young ladies at length got two instruments, that is to say, a harpsichord and a spinet too, and then they taught me themselves.
Madame had never been able to extract four correct notes from either viol or harpsichord.
The nervous quiver of his hand, which moved on the shoulder of his companion as the fingers of a player on the keys of a harpsichord, betrayed his burning impatience, so ill concealed at certain times, and particularly at that moment, under the icy and sombre expression of his face.
Their outward garments were adorned with the figures of suns, moons, and stars; interwoven with those of fiddles, flutes, harps, trumpets, guitars, harpsichords, and many other instruments of music, unknown to us in Europe.
Born in Tehran in 1984, Esfahani studied piano with his father before exploring the harpsichord as a teenager.
Esfahani studied harpsichord in Boston, and spent many years playing under the guidance of legendary Czech harpsichordist Zuzana Ruzickova.