harrow


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Related to harrow: disc harrow

Har·row

 (hăr′ō)
A borough of Greater London in southeast England. It is the site of the public school Harrow, founded in 1572.

har·row 1

 (hăr′ō)
n.
A farm implement consisting of a heavy frame with sharp teeth or upright disks, used to break up and even off plowed ground.
tr.v. har·rowed, har·row·ing, har·rows
1. To break up and level (soil or land) with a harrow.
2. To inflict great distress or torment on.

[Middle English harwe.]

har′row·er n.

har·row 2

 (hăr′ō)
tr.v. har·rowed, har·row·ing, har·rows Archaic
To plunder or rob (Hell of redeemed souls). Used of Jesus after the Crucifixion.

[Middle English herwen, variant of harien; see harry.]

harrow

(ˈhærəʊ)
n
(Agriculture) any of various implements used to level the ground, stir the soil, break up clods, destroy weeds, etc, in soil
vb
1. (Agriculture) (tr) to draw a harrow over (land)
2. (Agriculture) (intr) (of soil) to become broken up through harrowing
3. (tr) to distress; vex
[C13: of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish harv, Swedish harf; related to Middle Dutch harke rake]
ˈharrower n
ˈharrowing adj, n
ˈharrowingly adv

harrow

(ˈhærəʊ)
vb (tr)
1. to plunder or ravish
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (of Christ) to descend into (hell) to rescue righteous souls
[C13: variant of Old English hergian to harry]
ˈharrowment n

Harrow

(ˈhærəʊ)
n
(Placename) a borough of NW Greater London; site of an English boys' public school founded in 1571 at Harrow-on-the-Hill, a part of this borough. Pop: 210 700 (2003 est). Area: 51 sq km (20 sq miles)

har•row1

(ˈhær oʊ)

n.
1. an agricultural implement with spikelike teeth or upright disks, for leveling and breaking up clods in plowed land.
v.t.
2. to draw a harrow over (land).
3. to disturb keenly or painfully; distress the mind, feelings, etc., of.
v.i.
4. to become broken up by harrowing, as soil.
[1250–1300; Middle English harwe; akin to Old Norse herfi harrow, Middle Dutch harke rake]
har′row•er, n.

har•row2

(ˈhær oʊ)

v.t. Archaic.
to despoil.
[before 1000; Middle English harwen, herwen, Old English hergian to harry]
har′row•ment, n.

Har•row

(ˈhær oʊ)

n.
a borough of Greater London, in SE England. 201,300.

harrow

, harrowing - To harrow is to wound the feelings or cause to suffer—which gives us harrowing.
See also related terms for suffer.

harrow


Past participle: harrowed
Gerund: harrowing

Imperative
harrow
harrow
Present
I harrow
you harrow
he/she/it harrows
we harrow
you harrow
they harrow
Preterite
I harrowed
you harrowed
he/she/it harrowed
we harrowed
you harrowed
they harrowed
Present Continuous
I am harrowing
you are harrowing
he/she/it is harrowing
we are harrowing
you are harrowing
they are harrowing
Present Perfect
I have harrowed
you have harrowed
he/she/it has harrowed
we have harrowed
you have harrowed
they have harrowed
Past Continuous
I was harrowing
you were harrowing
he/she/it was harrowing
we were harrowing
you were harrowing
they were harrowing
Past Perfect
I had harrowed
you had harrowed
he/she/it had harrowed
we had harrowed
you had harrowed
they had harrowed
Future
I will harrow
you will harrow
he/she/it will harrow
we will harrow
you will harrow
they will harrow
Future Perfect
I will have harrowed
you will have harrowed
he/she/it will have harrowed
we will have harrowed
you will have harrowed
they will have harrowed
Future Continuous
I will be harrowing
you will be harrowing
he/she/it will be harrowing
we will be harrowing
you will be harrowing
they will be harrowing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been harrowing
you have been harrowing
he/she/it has been harrowing
we have been harrowing
you have been harrowing
they have been harrowing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been harrowing
you will have been harrowing
he/she/it will have been harrowing
we will have been harrowing
you will have been harrowing
they will have been harrowing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been harrowing
you had been harrowing
he/she/it had been harrowing
we had been harrowing
you had been harrowing
they had been harrowing
Conditional
I would harrow
you would harrow
he/she/it would harrow
we would harrow
you would harrow
they would harrow
Past Conditional
I would have harrowed
you would have harrowed
he/she/it would have harrowed
we would have harrowed
you would have harrowed
they would have harrowed

Harrow

Harrows are the primary implements used to break up dirt clods, fill in holes, and generally level the ground after it has been broken by a turning plow. One of the earlier approaches to harrowing, and one that survived on a limited scale through many centuries, was merely to drag a tree limb with plenty of branches on it over the ground. Harrows to be pulled by horses were made in five-foot wide sections, with provisions for linking them together side-by-side to make them wider. Each section was considered a load for one horse. Thus, if three sections were linked together side-by-side, three horses were used to pull the combination.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.harrow - a cultivator that pulverizes or smooths the soil
cultivator, tiller - a farm implement used to break up the surface of the soil (for aeration and weed control and conservation of moisture)
disc harrow, disk harrow - a harrow with a series of disks set on edge at an angle
Verb1.harrow - draw a harrow over (land)
farming, husbandry, agriculture - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
plow, plough, turn - to break and turn over earth especially with a plow; "Farmer Jones plowed his east field last week"; "turn the earth in the Spring"

harrow

verb
Archaic. To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war:
Archaic: spoil.
Translations
brány
äeshara
borona
akėčios
aanjagenangstdoenegegge
brona
grapă
brána
brana

harrow

[ˈhærəʊ] (Agr)
A. Ngrada f, rastra f
B. VT
1. (Agr) → gradar
2. (fig) → torturar, destrozar

harrow

[ˈhærəʊ] nherse f

harrow

(Agr)
nEgge f
vt
(Agr) → eggen
(fig, usu pass) to harrow somebodyjdn quälen or peinigen (geh)

harrow

[ˈhærəʊ] (Agr)
1. nerpice m
2. vterpicare
References in classic literature ?
A temporary compromise was effected between the two parties by the securing for James of a post as assistant-master at Harrow House, the private school of one Blatherwick, M.A., the understanding being that if he could hold the job he could remain in England and write, if it pleased him, in his spare time.
Harrow House was a grim mansion on the outskirts of Dover.
Byron had now to take his place among boys of his own class, and when he was thirteen he was sent to school at Harrow. But he hated school.
When the corn was sown, I had no harrow, but was forced to go over it myself, and drag a great heavy bough of a tree over it, to scratch it, as it may be called, rather than rake or harrow it.
On the evening of the twenty-fifth, as they were entering Arras, and as D'Artagnan was dismounting at the inn of the Golden Harrow to drink a glass of wine, a horseman came out of the post yard, where he had just had a relay, started off at a gallop, and with a fresh horse took the road to Paris.
Before commencing operations, his head had presented a surface of short bristling hairs, and by the time I had concluded my unskilful operation it resembled not a little a stubble field after being gone over with a harrow. However, as the chief expressed the liveliest satisfaction at the result, I was too wise to dissent from his opinion.
Aylward, Johnston, let your men form a harrow on either side of the ridge.
I shall just motor my people up to Harrow and get back again by midnight."
"I was so harrowed up in my mind last night that I didn't think about my clothes at all," said Anne.
There was a merry chatter of peasant women over their linen at the pond, and the ring of axes in the yard, where the peasants were repairing ploughs and harrows. The real spring had come.
None; unless it avail him somewhat that he was broker, down by long and exquisite suffering; that his mind was darkened and confused by the very remorse which harrowed it; that, between fleeing as an avowed criminal, and remaining as a hypocrite, conscience might find it hard to strike the balance; that it was human to avoid the peril of death and infamy, and the inscrutable machinations of an enemy; that, finally, to this poor pilgrim, on his dreary and desert path, faint, sick, miserable, there appeared a glimpse of human affection and sympathy, a new life, and a true one, in exchange for the heavy doom which he was now expiating.
They plow with a board slightly shod with iron; their trifling little harrows are drawn by men and women; small windmills grind the corn, ten bushels a day, and there is one assistant superintendent to feed the mill and a general superintendent to stand by and keep him from going to sleep.