haruspex

(redirected from haruspices)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ha·rus·pex

 (hə-rŭs′pĕks′, hăr′ə-spĕks′) also a·rus·pex (ə-rŭs′pĕks′)
n. pl. ha·rus·pi·ces (hə-rŭs′pĭ-sēz′) also a·rus·pi·ces (ə-rŭs′pĭ-sēz′)
A priest in ancient Rome who practiced divination by the inspection of the entrails of animals.

[Latin; see gherə- in Indo-European roots.]

ha·rus′pi·cate′ (-pĭ-kāt′) v.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

haruspex

(həˈrʌspɛks)
n, pl haruspices (həˈrʌspɪˌsiːz)
(Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) a priest who practised divination, esp by examining the entrails of animals
[C16: from Latin, probably from hīra gut + specere to look]
haruspical adj
haruspicy n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ha•rus•pex

(həˈrʌs pɛks, ˈhær əˌspɛks)

n., pl. ha•rus•pi•ces (həˈrʌs pəˌsiz)
one of a class of ancient Roman diviners who based their predictions on the interpretation of animal entrails, natural prodigies, and unusual meteorological phenomena.
[1575–85; < Latin, =haru-, akin to hīra intestine, Greek chordḗ gut (see chord1) + spec(ere) to look at]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

haruspex

also aruspex
noun
A person who foretells future events by or as if by supernatural means:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Schemes, evasions, calculations and bargains multiply, all based on polls interpreted by the modern equivalents of Roman haruspices. Another corpse.
All were "seers." What distinguishes Virgil, nevertheless, from the soothsayers, augurs, astrologers, haruspices or omen readers, mantics, and divines in this circle is that his prophesying is an interpretation of history.
These unnamed priests, who consulted and interpreted a sacrifice that turned out to be against the emperor's project, were probably haruspices, experts in the Etrusca disciplina; the legal recognition of Christianity was not in their best interest, all the more so in that famous contemporary Christian intellectuals, such as Origen, overtly criticised haruspicy.
Throughout history, assorted shamans, haruspices, auspices, astrologers, sibyls, kaballahists, pyromancers, Hegelians, Marxists, palmists, tarot-card readers, stock chartists, and computer modelers have made good livings off of the apparently limitless market demand for more certainty and reduced risk.
Tambem as digressoes dos livros XI e XII, ao refletir os interesses de Claudio como censor, mostram aspectos que seriam talvez meramente ilustrativos se inseridas em outros pontos do texto, como, por exemplo, no caso das letras do alfabeto (XI, 13-14) e do colegio dos haruspices (XI, 15).