harvestable


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har·vest

 (här′vĭst)
n.
1. The act or process of gathering a crop.
2.
a. The crop that ripens or is gathered in a season.
b. The amount or measure of the crop gathered in a season.
c. The time or season of such gathering.
3. The result or consequence of an action: stuck with the harvest of a predecessor's decisions.
v. har·vest·ed, har·vest·ing, har·vests
v.tr.
1.
a. To gather (a crop).
b. To take or kill (fish or deer, for example) for food, sport, or population control.
c. To extract from a culture or a living or recently deceased body, especially for transplantation: harvested bone marrow.
2. To gather a crop from (land, for example).
3. To receive or collect (energy): a turbine that harvests energy from tidal currents.
4. To receive (the benefits or consequences of an action). See Synonyms at reap.
v.intr.
To gather a crop.

[Middle English, from Old English hærfest; see kerp- in Indo-European roots.]

har′vest·a·ble adj.
har′vest·a·bil′i·ty n.

harvestable

(ˈhɑːvɪstəbəl)
adj
(Agriculture) capable of being harvested
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References in periodicals archive ?
After 80 days from planting, the bulbs are harvestable.
He'll say he's smart enough to know when there's a harvestable surplus and sharp enough to get away with it.
9 million worth of harvestable rice crops in farms along Lake Lanao that were hit by flashfloods.
Most of these are on their fruit-bearing to harvestable stage.
Jef Boedt, general manager of Socfin Cambodia, said that since the company launched its rubber plantation in 2009, approximately 2,000 hectares of rubber have become harvestable, making it economically reasonable for Socfin to open its own processing factory.
Other success stories over the last decade include: A net increase of approximately 5,000 acres of safe, harvestable shellfish beds restored;
Maturing shrimp growth=(Shrimp reproduction (*) Harvestable shrimp population) - {Death rate (*) Maturing shrimp population (*) [(Half consumption (*) Maturing shrimp population) / (Algae population in maturing tank+epsilon) + 1} - (Transfer factor (*) Maturing shrimp population)
Other interesting things that the update will contain include: harvestable beetroots, polar bear mobs, new decorative banners and special terrain features - igloos in Arctic biomes, underground fossils and new village materials.
Would this require exclusion areas near the wind machines that could reduce harvestable crop yield?
Today, the harvestable gag grouper numbers have fallen but the red grouper fishing is still some of the best ever seen.
Historically, bonus depreciation on trees and vines was not allowed until the year the crop first became commercially harvestable.
Anglers desire high numbers of harvestable size fish, and fisheries managers are faced with the task of maintaining quality black crappie populations in various habitats, often under heavy exploitation (Miranda and Allen, 2000).