harvest

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har·vest

 (här′vĭst)
n.
1. The act or process of gathering a crop.
2.
a. The crop that ripens or is gathered in a season.
b. The amount or measure of the crop gathered in a season.
c. The time or season of such gathering.
3. The result or consequence of an action: stuck with the harvest of a predecessor's decisions.
v. har·vest·ed, har·vest·ing, har·vests
v.tr.
1.
a. To gather (a crop).
b. To take or kill (fish or deer, for example) for food, sport, or population control.
c. To extract from a culture or a living or recently deceased body, especially for transplantation: harvested bone marrow.
2. To gather a crop from (land, for example).
3. To receive or collect (energy): a turbine that harvests energy from tidal currents.
4. To receive (the benefits or consequences of an action). See Synonyms at reap.
v.intr.
To gather a crop.

[Middle English, from Old English hærfest; see kerp- in Indo-European roots.]

har′vest·a·ble adj.
har′vest·a·bil′i·ty n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

harvest

(ˈhɑːvɪst)
n
1. (Agriculture) the gathering of a ripened crop
2. (Agriculture) the crop itself or the yield from it in a single growing season
3. (Agriculture) the season for gathering crops
4. the product of an effort, action, etc: a harvest of love.
vb
5. (Agriculture) to gather or reap (a ripened crop) from (the place where it has been growing)
6. (tr) to receive or reap (benefits, consequences, etc)
7. (Surgery) (tr) chiefly US to remove (an organ) from the body for transplantation
[Old English hærfest; related to Old Norse harfr harrow, Old High German herbist autumn, Latin carpere to pluck, Greek karpos fruit, Sanskrit krpāna shears]
ˈharvesting n
ˈharvestless adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

har•vest

(ˈhɑr vɪst) n.
1. Also, har′vest•ing. the gathering of crops.
2. the season when ripened crops are gathered.
3. a crop or yield of one growing season.
4. a supply of anything gathered at maturity and stored: a harvest of wheat.
5. the result or consequence of any act, process, or event: a harvest of memories.
v.t.
6. to gather (a crop or the like); reap.
7. to gather the crop from: to harvest the fields.
8. to gain, win, etc. (a prize, product, etc.).
9. to catch or take for use: to harvest salmon from the river.
v.i.
10. to gather a crop; reap.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English hærfest, c. Old High German herbist, Old Norse haust; akin to harrow1]
har′vest•a•ble, adj.
har`vest•a•bil′i•ty, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Harvest

 one season’s yield of any natural product.
Examples: harvest of bark, 1880; of captives, 1613; of grouse, 1881; of hate; of honey, 1697; of mice, 1607; of perpetual peace, 1594; of souls.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

harvest


Past participle: harvested
Gerund: harvesting

Imperative
harvest
harvest
Present
I harvest
you harvest
he/she/it harvests
we harvest
you harvest
they harvest
Preterite
I harvested
you harvested
he/she/it harvested
we harvested
you harvested
they harvested
Present Continuous
I am harvesting
you are harvesting
he/she/it is harvesting
we are harvesting
you are harvesting
they are harvesting
Present Perfect
I have harvested
you have harvested
he/she/it has harvested
we have harvested
you have harvested
they have harvested
Past Continuous
I was harvesting
you were harvesting
he/she/it was harvesting
we were harvesting
you were harvesting
they were harvesting
Past Perfect
I had harvested
you had harvested
he/she/it had harvested
we had harvested
you had harvested
they had harvested
Future
I will harvest
you will harvest
he/she/it will harvest
we will harvest
you will harvest
they will harvest
Future Perfect
I will have harvested
you will have harvested
he/she/it will have harvested
we will have harvested
you will have harvested
they will have harvested
Future Continuous
I will be harvesting
you will be harvesting
he/she/it will be harvesting
we will be harvesting
you will be harvesting
they will be harvesting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been harvesting
you have been harvesting
he/she/it has been harvesting
we have been harvesting
you have been harvesting
they have been harvesting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been harvesting
you will have been harvesting
he/she/it will have been harvesting
we will have been harvesting
you will have been harvesting
they will have been harvesting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been harvesting
you had been harvesting
he/she/it had been harvesting
we had been harvesting
you had been harvesting
they had been harvesting
Conditional
I would harvest
you would harvest
he/she/it would harvest
we would harvest
you would harvest
they would harvest
Past Conditional
I would have harvested
you would have harvested
he/she/it would have harvested
we would have harvested
you would have harvested
they would have harvested
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.harvest - the yield from plants in a single growing seasonharvest - the yield from plants in a single growing season
yield, output - production of a certain amount
fruitage - the yield of fruit; "a tree highly recommended for its fruitage"
2.harvest - the consequence of an effort or activity; "they gathered a harvest of examples"; "a harvest of love"
consequence, effect, result, upshot, outcome, event, issue - a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon; "the magnetic effect was greater when the rod was lengthwise"; "his decision had depressing consequences for business"; "he acted very wise after the event"
3.harvest - the gathering of a ripened crop
gather, gathering - the act of gathering something
haying - the harvesting of hay
4.harvest - the season for gathering crops
farming, husbandry, agriculture - the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock
time of year, season - one of the natural periods into which the year is divided by the equinoxes and solstices or atmospheric conditions; "the regular sequence of the seasons"
Verb1.harvest - gather, as of natural products; "harvest the grapes"
cut - reap or harvest; "cut grain"
gather, pull together, collect, garner - assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together"
2.harvest - remove from a culture or a living or dead body, as for the purposes of transplantation; "The Chinese are said to harvest organs from executed criminals"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

harvest

noun
1. harvesting, picking, gathering, collecting, reaping, harvest-time 300 million tons of grain in the fields at the start of the harvest
2. crop, yield, year's growth, produce a bumper potato harvest
verb
1. gather, pick, collect, bring in, pluck, reap Many farmers are refusing to harvest the sugar cane.
2. collect, get, gain, earn, obtain, acquire, accumulate, garner, amass In his new career he has blossomed and harvested many awards.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

harvest

noun
1. The produce harvested from the land:
verb
To collect ripe crops:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
حَصَادموسِم الحَصاد ،حَصاديَجْني الثِّمار او الغلَّهيَحْصِدُ
sklizeňsklízet
høsthøste
korjatakorjata satosadonkorjuusato
žetižetva
aratásszüretel
panen
uppskera
収穫収穫する
수확수확하다
javapjovėnuimtipjovėjas
novākt ražupļaujaražas novākšana
žatvazberzberať úrodu
pobiranjepobratipridelekžetevžeti
skördskörda
เก็บเกี่ยวการเก็บเกี่ยว
hasathasat etmekhasat kaldırmakbiçmekekin biçme
thu hoạchvụ thu hoạch

harvest

[ˈhɑːvɪst]
A. N
1. (= act) [of cereals] → siega f; [of fruit, vegetables] → cosecha f, recolección f; [of grapes] → vendimia f
2. (= product) → cosecha f
3. (fig) → cosecha f
B. VT
1. (Agr) [+ cereals] → cosechar; [+ fruit, vegetables] → cosechar, recolectar; [+ grapes] → vendimiar
2. (fig) → cosechar
C. VIcosechar, segar
D. CPD harvest festival Nfiesta f de la cosecha
harvest home N (= festival) → fiesta f de la cosecha; (= season) → cosecha f
harvest moon Nluna f llena
harvest time Ncosecha f, siega f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

harvest

[ˈhɑːrvɪst]
n [corn] → moisson f; [rice] → récolte f; [fruit] → récolte f; [grapes] → vendange f
a poor harvest → une mauvaise récolte
vt [+ corn] → moissonner; [+ fruit] → récolter; [+ grapes] → vendanger
modif
at harvest time → pendant la moisson
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

harvest

nErnte f; (of wines, berries also)Lese f; (of the sea)Ausbeute f, → Ertrag m; (fig)Frucht f, → Ertrag m; the harvest of ideasdie Ausbeute an Ideen; a bumper potato harvesteine Rekordkartoffelernte; to reap the harvest of something (= benefit)die Früchte einer Sache (gen)ernten; (= suffer)die Konsequenzen einer Sache (gen)tragen
vt (= reap: also fig) → ernten; vines alsolesen; trees, timberschlagen; fishfangen; (= bring in)einbringen
viernten

harvest

:
harvest festival
nErntedankfest nt
harvest fly
n (Zool) → Zikade f
harvest home
n (→ Einbringen ntder) → Ernte f; (= festival)Erntedankfest nt
harvest moon
nHerbstmond m, heller Vollmond im September
harvest time
nErntezeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

harvest

[ˈhɑːvɪst]
1. n (of crop) → raccolto; (of grapes) → vendemmia
2. vt (gen) → fare il raccolto di, raccogliere; (grain) → mietere; (grapes) → vendemmiare
3. vi (on farm) → fare il raccolto, mietere; (in vineyard) → vendemmiare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

harvest

(ˈhaːvist) noun
the gathering in of ripened crops. the rice harvest.
verb
to gather in (crops etc). We harvested the apples yesterday.
ˈharvester noun
a person or machine that harvests corn.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

harvest

حَصَاد, يَحْصِدُ sklizeň, sklízet høst, høste Ernte, ernten δρέπω, συγκομιδή cosecha, cosechar korjata sato, sadonkorjuu récolte, récolter žeti, žetva raccogliere, raccolto 収穫, 収穫する 수확, 수확하다 oogst, oogsten høste, innhøsting zebrać plony, żniwa colheita, colher сбор урожая, собирать урожай skörd, skörda เก็บเกี่ยว, การเก็บเกี่ยว hasat, hasat kaldırmak thu hoạch, vụ thu hoạch 收割, 收获
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

har·vest

n. recolección, obtención o separación de bacterias u otros microorganismos de un cultivo; cosecha.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
His light, a little later, broke though chinks of cottage shutters, throwing stripes like red-hot pokers upon cupboards, chests of drawers, and other furniture within; and awakening harvesters who were not already astir.
Rabbits, hares, snakes, rats, mice, retreated inwards as into a fastness, unaware of the ephemeral nature of their refuge, and of the doom that awaited them later in the day when, their covert shrinking to a more and more horrible narrowness, they were huddled together, friends and foes, till the last few yards of upright wheat fell also under the teeth of the unerring reaper, and they were every one put to death by the sticks and stones of the harvesters.
The harvesters ceased working, took their provisions, and sat down against one of the shocks.
The harvesters slept in the hayloft because it was cooler there than in the house.
When you and I can build sewing-machines instead of battle-ships, harvesters of crops instead of harvesters of men, plow-shares and telephones, schools and colleges, printing-presses and paper!
The harvesters were back in the fields once more and the golfers, in pairs and fours, were still streaming round the links.
In the next room were wonderful machines that ate up long steel rods by slow stages, cutting them off, seizing the pieces, stamping heads upon them, grinding them and polishing them, threading them, and finally dropping them into a basket, all ready to bolt the harvesters together.
And then one afternoon, the ninth of his work in the place, when he went to get his overcoat he saw a group of men crowded before a placard on the door, and when he went over and asked what it was, they told him that beginning with the morrow his department of the harvester works would be closed until further notice!
He met this man on his way to work in the giant factories of the Harvester Trust; and his friend told him to come along and he would speak a good word for him to his boss, whom he knew well.
He advanced thus into the very thickest of the cavalry, with the tranquil slowness, the lolling of the head and the regular breathing of a harvester attacking a field of wheat.
The Bell Telephone now took its place with the Telegraph, the Railroad, the Steamboat, the Harvester, and the other necessities of a civilized country.
Yet I know that I arrived this very morning from China, with a quick passage to my credit, and master of the barkentine Harvester. And I know that to-morrow morning I shall run over to Oakland to see Neil Partington and his wife and family, and later on up to Benicia to see Charley Le Grant and talk over old times.