harvest-time

(redirected from harvesttime)

harvest-time

or

harvesttime

n
the time during which an annual crop is harvested
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
He had no money for carfare, but it was harvesttime, and they walked one day and worked the next; and so Adams got at last to Chicago, and joined the Socialist party.
We assessed seasonal changes in activity by comparing total weekly encounter rates across all cameras within three crop harvesttime periods: preharvest (July 14 to Aug.
On her initial visit to Lebanon in September-October 2016, she saw harvesttime landscapes, after the summer heat, and before the winter rain.
The author includes the history of many of the regional and holiday bakery items, like the Neapolitan Casatiello, larded with hard-cooked eggs, cheeses, and cured meats; harvesttime Grape and Rosemary Buns licked with olive oil, rosemary, and cinnamon; and the Le Marche region's Pane di Farina di Ceci e Semo, a savory Pannettone-cousin that crowns the Easter feast.
"We have stocks of rice to sustain them harvesttime," he said.
Faith gave me many trigrams, and others helped as well: Lois with taXIIng, eYEIng, beAUIng, harveSTTime and laMPPost, Peggy with taCTFul, Mary Lois with rUFEscent, my father with BAMboozle, and Marvin Epstein with scuLPTor and sovereiGNTy.
WATER regularly through harvesttime. FEED about 10 days after planting by fertilizing beside the planted rows.
The United States had recently done away with a program in which foreign temporary workers, called braceros, would be shipped in from Mexico each year to pick crops during harvesttime. Having braceros out of the picture made organizing U.S.
Adverse weather at harvesttime often occurs in Oklahoma which can lead to substantial preharvest loss of seedcotton.
From early spring to harvesttime last year, Iowa farmer Bill Horan watched over a small plot of corn that grew behind an electric fence, bordered by a moat of fallow earth, a quarter mile from the next cornfield.