hatbox


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hat·box

 (hăt′bŏks′)
n.
A box or case for a hat.

hatbox

(ˈhætˌbɒks)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a box or case for a hat or hats

hat•box

(ˈhætˌbɒks)

n.
a case or box for a hat.
[1785–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hatbox - a round piece of luggage for carrying hatshatbox - a round piece of luggage for carrying hats
baggage, luggage - cases used to carry belongings when traveling
Translations

hatbox

[ˈhætbɒks] Nsombrerera f

hatbox

[ˈhætbɒks] ncarton m à chapeau

hatbox

[ˈhætˌbɒks] ncappelliera
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Up goes Tom, the guard catching his hatbox and holding on with one hand, while with the other he claps the horn to his mouth.
Over the past three years, Hatbox has drawn more than 16,000 patrons to its nine to 12 shows a year.
Sliding doors make getting in and out of the back an easy task even in tight parking spaces and, although the rear door bins are a little on the small side to accommodate those seats, storage elsewhere in the cabin is plentiful and includes two glove boxes and a commodious 'hatbox' compartment above the windscreen.
The new 1,200-sq-ft store will be the fifth store in the Middle East featuring two walls of floating shelves showcasing the brand's trunk and hatbox collections, plus a "library" room at the back of the store which will contain a personalisation machine, circular cash desk with bar stools, elegant chandeliers and frieze mouldings.
What did Baird have in mind as he built his first working TV set out of an old hatbox, darning needles, a tea chest, sealing wax, glue and lenses from a few bicycle lights?
I leapt back, hands protecting my face, for crouched in that hatbox were three crows, beaks agape in their desire for flesh." It takes Poe but a moment to determine that the dead birds are an unwanted gift from his arch-foe, George Rhynwick Williams.
The story centers on Lara Jean Song, to be played by Lana Condor, who keeps her handwritten love letters in a hatbox. With a total of five letters to the five boys she has ever loved, the letters contain her thoughts and feelings toward each guy knowing she would not be able to express it verbally.
One Sunday afternoon, I came across a trove of letters in a battered hatbox in the cupboard underneath the stairs.
In this way, the "baby" takes on an identity of objects, is made as useful and bland and edible, i.e., disposable, "as a hatbox or a cake." It is fat and posed as a trained elephant, and as carefully orchestrated as that elephant's stance when it is on "a little round platform, cramming all four feet together." (37) Words such as "perfectly" and "wonderful" appear like mechanical gears throughout the poem, estranged from a genuine sense of emotion, sterilized of any connection, and suggest a sense of decorum that overcomes attachment or sentiment.
I watched as she'd choose a hat from her mahogany dresser's built-in hatbox, place it on her head, grab a long pin, and plunge it through the hat and straight into her head.