haversine


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haversine

(ˈhævəˌsaɪn)
n
(Mathematics) obsolete half the value of the versed sine
[C19: combination of half + versed + sine1]
References in periodicals archive ?
Excitation waveforms such as sine, half sine, haversine, etc., are available, as well as the capability to apply a pre-recorded specific excitation shape, for example a real road response.
These tests consisted of controlled-strain haversine loading direct tensile tests and controlled-strain trapezoidal loading direct tensile tests.
(7.) The distance was computed using the Haversine formula (see Sinnott, 1984) from the geographic coordinates for the population centroids computed by the Bureau of the census for the years 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990.
Built-in functions include sine, square, triangle, ramp, pulse, sinc pulse, Gaussian pulse, Lorentz pulse, AM, FM, DC, haversine, havercosine, and serial data.
Although the haversine waveform is more appropriate for representing the tensile responses at the bottom of asphalt layer (especially in transverse direction) and has been recommended by ASTM D7460, some standards such as AASHTO T321 and EN 12697-26 recommend the sinusoidal waveform to perform fatigue tests of asphalt mixes.
In this paper, to simplify the calculation and simulation, traffic loads could be estimated using the haversine function as follows [35]:
The distance is calculated using the "Haversine" formula, which measures the shortest distance between two countries on the surface of the globe using the longitudes and latitudes of their center points.
Swimming speed was calculated by estimating the distance between adjacent positions using the Haversine formula for great circle distance on an R code program and dividing this by the time elapsed between both positions' time stamps.
We calculated Haversine distances (as the crow flies) (Robusto 1957) of SNFs from the centroid of patients' residential zip code.
Distance, expressed in kilometers, is the great circle distance between geographic centers, using the Haversine formula.
In the dynamic modulus test, the technicians applied a continuous haversine axial compressive load and used the resulting stresses and strains to calculate the dynamic modulus and phase angle.
To calculate distance using zip codes, we obtain the latitude and longitude corresponding to the zip codes (with data downloaded from http://www.qlx.com/zipcoder), and then use the Haversine formula (Sinnott 1984) to calculate the distance based on the latitude and longitude.