hawker


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hawk·er

 (hô′kər)
n.
One who sells goods aggressively, especially by calling out. Also called crier.

[Middle English hauker, probably from Middle Low German höker, from hōken, to peddle, bend, bear on the back.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hawker

(ˈhɔːkə)
n
(Commerce) a person who travels from place to place selling goods
[C16: probably from Middle Low German hōker, from hōken to peddle; see huckster]

hawker

(ˈhɔːkə)
n
(Falconry) a person who hunts with hawks, falcons, etc
[Old English hafecere; see hawk1, -er1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hawk•er1

(ˈhɔ kər)

n.
a person who hunts with hawks or other birds of prey.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English hafecere. See hawk1, -er1]

hawk•er2

(ˈhɔ kər)

n.
a person who hawks wares.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Middle Low German haker retail dealer]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hawker - someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)hawker - someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)
chapman - archaic term for an itinerant peddler
cheapjack - a peddler of inferior goods
crier - a peddler who shouts to advertise the goods he sells
muffin man - formerly an itinerant peddler of muffins
sandboy - a young peddler of sand; used now only to express great happiness in `happy as a sandboy'
marketer, seller, trafficker, vender, vendor - someone who promotes or exchanges goods or services for money
transmigrante - a Latin American who buys used goods in the United States and takes them to Latin America to sell
2.hawker - a person who breeds and trains hawks and who follows the sport of falconryhawker - a person who breeds and trains hawks and who follows the sport of falconry
hunter, huntsman - someone who hunts game
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

hawker

noun pedlar, tout, vendor, travelling salesman, crier, huckster, barrow boy (Brit.), door-to-door salesman It was a visitor and not a hawker or tramp at the door.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مُربّي الصُّقور
-kapodomní prodavač
dørsælgergadehandler
götusali; farandsali
işportacıseyyar satıcı

hawker

[ˈhɔːkəʳ] Nvendedor(a) m/f ambulante
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hawker

[ˈhɔːkər] ncolporteur/euse m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hawker

n
(= hunter)Falkner(in) m(f)
(= pedlar, door-to-door) → Hausierer(in) m(f); (in street) → Straßenhändler(in) m(f); (at market) → Marktschreier(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

hawker

[ˈhɔːkəʳ] nvenditore/trice ambulante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

hawk2

(hoːk) verb
to carry goods round for sale.
ˈhawker noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
His name does not affect my tale; but I tell you it was Philip Hawker, because I am telling you everything.
All we know is that the old squire, Hawker, somehow ran through his money (and his second wife's, I suppose, for she was rich enough), and sold the estate to a man named Verner.
All the time he lived with us the captain made no change whatever in his dress but to buy some stockings from a hawker. One of the cocks of his hat having fallen down, he let it hang from that day forth, though it was a great annoyance when it blew.
"Tramping, begging, thieving, working sometimes when I could - though that warn't as often as you may think, till you put the question whether you would ha' been over-ready to give me work yourselves - a bit of a poacher, a bit of a labourer, a bit of a waggoner, a bit of a haymaker, a bit of a hawker, a bit of most things that don't pay and lead to trouble, I got to be a man.
The third person who got out was a hawker from Gravesend well known to the porters.
Countrymen, butchers, drovers, hawkers, boys, thieves, idlers, and vagabonds of every low grade, were mingled together in a mass; the whistling of drovers, the barking dogs, the bellowing and plunging of the oxen, the bleating of sheep, the grunting and squeaking of pigs, the cries of hawkers, the shouts, oaths, and quarrelling on all sides; the ringing of bells and roar of voices, that issued from every public-house; the crowding, pushing, driving, beating, whooping and yelling; the hideous and discordant dim that resounded from every corner of the market; and the unwashed, unshaven, squalid, and dirty figues constantly running to and fro, and bursting in and out of the throng; rendered it a stunning and bewildering scene, which quite confounded the senses.
Even at ten o'clock, when the Rostovs got out of their carriage at the chapel, the sultry air, the shouts of hawkers, the light and gay summer clothes of the crowd, the dusty leaves of the trees on the boulevard, the sounds of the band and the white trousers of a battalion marching to parade, the rattling of wheels on the cobblestones, and the brilliant, hot sunshine were all full of that summer languor, that content and discontent with the present, which is most strongly felt on a bright, hot day in town.
On the wall behind it was hanging the same ragged Flemish tapestry where a faded king and queen were playing chess in a garden, while a company of hawkers rode by, carrying hooded birds on their gauntleted wrists.
All down Wellington Street people could be seen fluttering out the pink sheets and reading, and the Strand was suddenly noisy with the voices of an army of hawkers following these pioneers.
In and out among the seats went hawkers, their arms laden with small pennants to correspond with the rival tents.
Tink, tink, tink--clear as a silver bell, and audible at every pause of the streets' harsher noises, as though it said, 'I don't care; nothing puts me out; I am resolved to he happy.' Women scolded, children squalled, heavy carts went rumbling by, horrible cries proceeded from the lungs of hawkers; still it struck in again, no higher, no lower, no louder, no softer; not thrusting itself on people's notice a bit the more for having been outdone by louder sounds--tink, tink, tink, tink, tink.
I am even--permit me to say-- a thinker, though to be sure, this name nowadays seems to be the monopoly of hawkers of revolutionary wares, the slaves of some French or German thought--devil knows what foreign notions.