hawkishly


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hawk 1

 (hôk)
n.
1. Any of various birds of prey, especially of the genera Accipiter and Buteo in the family Accipitridae, characteristically having a short hooked bill and strong claws used for seizing.
2. Any of various similar birds of prey.
3. A person who preys on others; a shark.
4.
a. One who demonstrates an actively aggressive or combative attitude, as in an argument.
b. A person who favors military force or action in order to carry out foreign policy.
intr.v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
1. To hunt with trained hawks.
2. To swoop and strike in the manner of a hawk: "It was fun to watch the scattered snail kites ... lifting and falling in the wind as they hawked across the shining grass and water" (Peter Matthiessen).

[Middle English hauk, from Old English hafoc; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

hawk′ish adj.
hawk′ish·ly adv.
hawk′ish·ness n.

hawk 2

 (hôk)
v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
v.intr.
To peddle goods aggressively, especially by calling out.
v.tr.
To peddle (goods) aggressively, especially by calling out.

[Middle English hauken, back-formation from hauker; see hawker.]

hawk 3

 (hôk)
v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
v.intr.
To clear or attempt to clear the throat by or as if by coughing up phlegm.
v.tr.
To clear the throat of (phlegm).
n.
An audible effort to clear the throat by expelling phlegm.

[Imitative.]

hawkishly

(ˈhɔːkɪʃlɪ)
adv
in a hawklike manner
References in periodicals archive ?
Rosengren is a voter this year and leans more hawkishly.
economic data remains robust, his speech is likely to be hawkishly tilted.
Deydier describes her reluctance to take trains or busses because of frequent derision from fellow passengers, the discomfort of being out of breath even after walking a short distance, and the sense of having her eating habits watched hawkishly.
KUWAIT, June 25 (KUNA) -- In a generally calm week after the Fed hawkishly hiked interest rates, the future pace of monetary tightening is unknown.
Peres, who became director general of the nascent defense ministry at just 29 years old, once hawkishly rejected any compromise with Arab states.