hawkweed


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Related to hawkweed: Hawksbeard, yellow hawkweed, meadow hawkweed

hawk·weed

 (hôk′wēd′)
n.
Any of numerous often hairy plants of the genus Hieracium of the composite family, having yellow or orange dandelionlike flower heads.

hawkweed

(ˈhɔːkˌwiːd)
n
(Plants) any typically hairy plant of the genus Hieracium, with clusters of dandelion-like flowers: family Asteraceae (composites)

hawk•weed

(ˈhɔkˌwid)

n.
any weedy composite plant of the genus Hieracium, usu. bearing yellow or orange flower clusters.
[1555–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hawkweed - any of various plants of the genus Pilosellahawkweed - any of various plants of the genus Pilosella
genus Pilosella, Pilosella - genus of hairy perennial herbs with horizontal rhizomes and leafy or underground stolons; Eurasia and North Africa; often considered congeneric with Hieracium
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
2.hawkweed - any of numerous often hairy plants of the genus Hieracium having yellow or orange flowers that resemble the dandelion
genus Hieracium, Hieracium - large genus of perennial hairy herbs of Europe to western Asia to northwestern Africa and North America; few are ornamental; often considered congeneric with Pilosella
Hieracium venosum, rattlesnake weed - a hawkweed with a rosette of purple-veined basal leaves; Canada to northern Georgia and Kentucky
Hieracium pilocella, mouse-ear hawkweed, Pilosella officinarum - European hawkweed having soft hairy leaves; sometimes placed in genus Hieracium
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
References in periodicals archive ?
Mae enw tebyg ar blanhigyn arall hefyd, sef y 'Fox and Cubs',' neu'r Orange Hawkweed yn Saesneg, a Pilosella aurantiaca ydi'r enw gwyddonol arno.
FThe variation in rock types and landscapes, for example - from the limestone of the Gower Peninsular to the mudstone and volcanic rock of Snowdonia - play host to many rare and special plants, such as Ley's Whitebeam or the Black Mountain Hawkweed.
The wildflowers here are spectacular, including rare Alpine species, such as sawwort, hawkweed and purple and mountain saxifrage.
Wild strawberry, mullein, black-eyed Susan, yellow loosestrife, bullhead lily, milkweed, Queen Anne's lace, blue-eyed grass, Asiatic day flower, hawkweed, heal-all, spotted wintergreen, skullcap, blue flag, and touch-me-not are about to blossom all around us.
Other plants, especially weeds such as hawkweed and dandelions, can produce true seeds that are clones of themselves without sexual reproduction -- a still poorly understood process called apomixis.
A seedy eye of orange hawkweed blinks in sunlight stupidly, a mink bumbles away, a ringnecked snake among stones lifts its head like a spark, a dead young woodcock-- long dead, the mink will not touch it-- sprawls in the hatchment of its soft plumage and clutches emptiness with drawn talons.
The events will give people a chance to learn about wildflowers found at the site such as ladies bedstraw, musk thistle, mouse-ear hawkweed and wild thyme.
Machel and Febe's Women of the Forest Vegetable Stew (6-8 servings or 2 servings for a couple of really hungry women) Ingredients: Olive oil 6-8 cloves of garlic 1-2 onions 2-3 potatoes 3-4 chopped carrots 2-3 large beets and tops Dandelions (flowers and leaves) 3/4 cup chopped cabbage Orange hawkweed ("devil's paintbrush") flowers and leaves Pepper and sea salt to taste Nutritional yeast Herbs de Province (blend of rosemary, tarragon, lavender flowers, thyme and oregano) In a large cast iron pot, pour in 1/4 cup of olive oil.
C[pounds sterling]From oxeye daisy, to wild rose, bright red poppies to heartsease, from white clover to fire lily and orange hawkweed to ladyCOs mantle and lots more; the collection lifts spirits like the beauty of the wildflowers.
Just to give you an idea I have found two chamomile patches, two species of buttercup, dandelions, daisies, three species of plantain, field wood rush, self heal, an unidentified tiny wild cranesbill, ragwort, two species of clover, speedwell, hawkbit and hawkweed.
Other popular species were: mouse-ear hawkweed (Pilosella officinarum F.
Another team reported the reemergence of sex in a plant--a hawkweed (Hieracium pilosella).