headnote


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head·note

 (hĕd′nōt′)
n.
A note placed at the beginning of a chapter, a page, or a document such as a report, that provides brief explanatory information.

headnote

(ˈhɛdˌnəʊt)
n
(Law) law a note added to the text of a case following a court decision
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References in periodicals archive ?
1 small shallot, minced and soaked in ice water for 30 minutes, then drained (see headnote)
It provides methods to identify and retrieve secondary sources, a chart identifying binding cases in almost every situation, explanation of how to find cases on Lexis Advance using its headnote system, methods to find cases that interpret and apply relevant statutes, information on reading relevant statutes critically, the differences between using citators for cases and statutes, and chapters on finding persuasive authorities for common law and statutory issues.
Headnote: A transaction network for the legal industry based in San Francisco
And unlike her distinguished American counterpart Studs Terkel, who sometimes set the scene in a headnote to an interview, she gives us little or no background on her subjects, usually just something as cryptic as "Olga V., surveyor, 24".
Likewise, Tonson prints Miltons original headnote, which self-identities as a metaphrastic translation.
The headnote for the review listed the identical ISBN and price, $150.00, for each volume, which may have caused some readers to conclude that the price for the entire set is $600.00.
Corriher, an acclaimed culinary problem-solver, offers more than 230 recipes in CookWise--many of which are accompanied by a "what this recipe shows" headnote that reveals the chemistry behind the recipe, to further your learning.
For each speech, he provides a long headnote, with most running two to three pages.
Southern Pacific Railroad (1886), in which Santa Clara County attempted to collect taxes from the Southern Pacific Railroad company because its tracks ran through Santa Clara County among other counties in California, court reporter Bancrost Davis issued a headnote expressing the court's unanimous opinion that corporations are persons equally protected by the 14th Amendment.
Breaking with traditional concepts of period, authorship, and genre, Worlding America groups the different types of narratives it anthologizes according to key subject areas such as "Life Writing," "Female Agency," or the "Cultures of Print." Each section is introduced by a headnote that explains relevant historical and literary developments, situating each narrative in its cultural context and providing its publication history.
Each letter is introduced by a headnote that contains up to eight types of information: title, a list of the sources, details of extant replies, a discussion of the date, an analysis of the sources used to construct the text, details of any surviving address, miscellaneous observations, and a synopsis of the contents in English.