headrig

headrig

(ˈhɛdˌrɪɡ)
n
(in a sawmill) a saw that cuts logs into smaller pieces
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Were they locals they would be unimpressed by the initial flourish of rural argot: "shafts," "wing," "sock," "headrig." Interestingly, the speaker draws on this lexicon for only the first two quatrains.
The fundamental design of sawmills has not changed since the early part of the twentieth century, although productivity has increased significantly throughout the period.(3) Logs are delivered to the headrig, or saw, by means of the carriage, and then cut lumber from the "green chain" is sorted and stacked.
A moving account recently published in The Oregonian describes one such incident in Sweet Home, Oregon: "The blue paint on the butt clearly identified as 'last log' the six- foot-diameter piece of hemlock rolling onto the headrig carriage at 10:39 a.m.
"We have a headrig offbearer who guides the logs," she said.
In this sense, log grading becomes perhaps the most important decision a mill can make and at least on a par with the primary breakdown process at the mill headrig. Lumber grade yields are a direct function of the defects or lack thereof on each face of the log and how the log is positioned for sawing in the context of the visible defects.
"With the addition of equipment, expansion of physical plant and an increased number of employees, we have experienced significant growth," says Russ Jamison, marketing director at Kretz Lumber, "However, none of this would have an impact on our goal of striving for excellence if it were not for all our employees' focus on safety and quality." The company recently added four dry kilns, automatic sticker machine, two resaws, canning equipment at the headrig, two log trucks, and one rip saw as it enters its second consecutive year in the WOOD 100.
Credited for the invention of the chipping headrig; Pe!er is best remembered as the renowned Chief Wood Scientist, Southern Forest Experiment Station, USDA Forest Service.
During primary log breakdown, a log is sawn into flitches at the headrig. These flitches are then edged or trimmed into lumber during the secondary breakdown process.
Woods-length logs are typically bucked into mill-length logs before entering the mill's headrig. Resulting log lengths influence revenues and logging costs important to forest managers, logging contractors, and mill managers.
When wood cutting by laser was first done, far-out thinkers were predicting a "kerfless" laser headrig for the sawmill.
The characteristics of sawing equipment, such as headrig type, headrig kerf width, and sawing thickness variation, were recorded during the measurement process.