headward

headward

(ˈhɛdwəd)
adj
(Physical Geography) (of river erosion) cutting backwards or upstream above the original source, which recedes
adv
(Physical Geography) a variant of headwards
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References in periodicals archive ?
For decades, researchers have investigated the human response under caudocephalad (headward) accelerations and the corresponding potential for thoracolumbar injury.
TECTONIC ACTIVITY CONTROL OVER THE HEADWARD EROSION PROCESS: THE COMBEIMA RIVER BASIN CASE, CENTRAL MOUNTAIN RANGE, COLOMBIA
If avulsions do occur, they may also develop a tendency to develop by incision of the floodplain from headward cutting channels, rather than by downward propagation.
Aircraft Human Roll X Pitch Y Yaw Z Direction of Occupant's Inertial Tolerance Level Acceleration Response Headward (+Gz) Eyeballs Down 20-25G Tailward (-Gz) Eyeballs Up 15G Lateral Right (+Gy) Eyeballs Left 20 G Lateral Left (-Gy) Eyeballs Right 20G Back to Chest (+Gx) Eyeballs Out 45G Chest to Back (-Gx) Eyeballs In 45G
3) having formed as a consequence of the post-glacial topography and headward erosion of a post-glacial tributary following the buried valley of Mud Brook from the Cuyahoga Valley.
anterior mberi means 'forward', mberi kumberi 'towards the front' ventral muhamba means 'the hamba underside of an animal' posterior seri means 'behind', kuseri seri towards the back' superior soro means 'headward', soro kusoro 'towards the head' inferior zasi 'downward' or uswe zasi or uswe tailwards' lateral divi or rutivi means divi sidewards', kudivi 'towards the side medial pakati 'middle', neche mukati mukati towards midline Table 3.
(1983) that the development of the drainage network of the Ebro and its debouchment into the Mediterranean was due to some small E or SE flowing stream which had cut by headward erosion the Catalan Coastal Ranges during the low sea-level interval of the Messinian (Late Miocene), when it had increased energy/stream power.
Further, most cases of catastrophic drainage--defined here as loss by lakes of at least 20% of their surface area over the duration--occurred as a result of breaching by stream meandering, headward erosion of streams, or lake coalescence.
A lowering of the Besko Basin during the Late Weichselian and Holocene led to the formation of a regressional (partly antecendent?) water-gap of the Wislok River, and favoured intensive headward erosion in its valley.
Headward progression of knick-points in major active drainages such as the Avon River (such as at Mundaring) is currently removing Miocene to Pliocene sediments from adjacent up-catchment palaeovalley reaches.
However, even Nichols (1986: 87), whose principle of "Headward Migration" posits a one-way path of development in the movement of affixal morphology from dependent to head, allows that "[r]eversal of the headward-migration principle can only occur because of boundaryshifts." The pause phenomena examined in this article may well represent the first stage of such a boundary shift in Dalabon.