health care


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health care

also health·care (hĕlth′kâr′)
n.
The prevention, treatment, and management of illness and the preservation of mental and physical well-being through the services offered by the medical and allied health professions.
adj. also health-care (hĕlth′kâr′)
Of or relating to health care: the health care industry.

health care

n
the provision of medical services(as modifier)

health′ care`

or health′care`,



n.
any field or enterprise concerned with supplying services, equipment, information, etc., for the maintenance or restoration of health.
[1940–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.health care - social insurance for the ill and injuredhealth care - social insurance for the ill and injured
social insurance - government provision for unemployed, injured, or aged people; financed by contributions from employers and employees as well as by government revenue
Medicare - health care for the aged; a federally administered system of health insurance available to persons aged 65 and over
Medicaid - health care for the needy; a federally and state-funded program
primary health care - health care that is provided by a health care professional in the first contact of a patient with the health care system
2.health care - the preservation of mental and physical health by preventing or treating illness through services offered by the health professionhealth care - the preservation of mental and physical health by preventing or treating illness through services offered by the health profession
care, tending, attention, aid - the work of providing treatment for or attending to someone or something; "no medical care was required"; "the old car needs constant attention"
Translations
zdravotnictví
zdravstvo

health care

nassistenza sanitaria

health care

n atención or asistencia médica, atención or asistencia sanitaria (esp.Esp), servicios de salud or sanitarios or médicos, salud f; — — directive V. advance directive; — — provider profesional mf sanitario, proveedor -ra mf de salud; — — system sistema m de salud; home — — atención médica domiciliaria; right to — — derecho a atención or asistencia médica, derecho a servicios de salud; to obtain — — obtener atención or asistencia médica; universal — — sistema m de salud universal; [Note: health care is a broad concept which admits many possible translations in Spanish. The above examples reflect current usage.]
References in classic literature ?
But when most people are working harder for less, when others cannot work at all, when the cost of health care devastates families and threatens to bankrupt our enterprises, great and small; when the fear of crime robs law abiding citizens of their freedom; and when millions of poor children cannot even imagine the lives we are calling them to lead, we have not made change our friend.
On the third day of Christmas, health care gave to me: "Three upward trends..." (Susanne Sonik, Director of the Section for Long-Term Care and Rehabilitation, American Hospital Association) Two less regulations, and a patient-first philosophy.
The aforementioned change in health care policy is being fueled by the public and private sector's concern for cost control.
Dada, also the chief financial officer, was able to secure the employees' cooperation by explaining that continued health care cost increases would drag down their total compensation, including salaries.
The federal government, states, payers, and business partnerships in many areas have increasingly been forcing some kinds of transparency on health care providers, demanding that they post process quality numbers, patient satisfaction results, adverse events reports, and even prices for procedures.
Using weighted logistic regression, the analysts sought to identify indicators of health care access that are significantly associated with the risk of chlamydia infection, controlling for age and race or ethnicity; they examined data on males and females separately.
Cenaiko, Wakaw, Sask., Health Care; Pierre Daloze, Mont St-Hilaire, Que., Health Care; Anne Fanning, Edmonton, Alta., Health Care; Ann C.
Enter a remedy that has been bubbling underground for some time: consumer-driven health care. Place a fixed amount of health-care money in the hands of employees and dependents, engage them in the process of making smarter decisions about medical care and see the cost of health care equilibrate.
Apparently, the practice is not just limited to Catholic hospitals (which constitute the nation's largest nonprofit provider of health care).
The exploding costs of health care and the lack of any immediate cost-cutting alternative have created a political environment that is far more open to reform than it was in 1994.
To be sure, politicians have paid a lot of attention to health care problems in recent years.
The link between health care costs and corporate failures is clear in at least two major industries, steel and airlines, and there's speculation that the auto industry could be next.

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