hearse


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hearse

 (hûrs)
n.
1. A vehicle for conveying a coffin to a church or cemetery.
2. Christianity A triangular candelabrum used at Tenebrae during Holy Week.
3. A framelike structure over a coffin or tomb on which to hang epitaphs.

[Middle English herse, a harrow-shaped structure for holding candles over a coffin, from Old French herce, from Medieval Latin hercia, from Latin hirpex, hirpic-, harrow, probably from Oscan hirpus, wolf (alluding to its teeth).]

hearse

(hɜːs)
n
(Automotive Engineering) a vehicle, such as a specially designed car or carriage, used to carry a coffin to a place of worship and ultimately to a cemetery or crematorium
[C14: from Old French herce, from Latin hirpex harrow]

hearse

(hɜrs)

n.
1. a vehicle for conveying a dead person to the place of burial.
2. a triangular frame for holding candles, used at Tenebrae.
3. a canopy erected over a tomb.
[1250–1300; Middle English herse < Middle French herce a harrow < Latin hirpicem, acc. of hirpex]
hearse′like`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hearse - a vehicle for carrying a coffin to a church or a cemeteryhearse - a vehicle for carrying a coffin to a church or a cemetery; formerly drawn by horses but now usually a motor vehicle
automotive vehicle, motor vehicle - a self-propelled wheeled vehicle that does not run on rails
Translations
عَرَبَة أو سَيّارة الموتى
pohřební vůz
ligvogn
ruumisauto
halottaskocsi
líkvagn
katafalkas
katafalkslīķrati
pohrebné auto
cenaze arabası

hearse

[hɜːs] Ncoche m or (LAm) carro m fúnebre

hearse

[ˈhɜːrs] ncorbillard m

hearse

nLeichenwagen m

hearse

[hɜːs] ncarro funebre

hearse

(həːs) noun
a car used for carrying a dead body in a coffin to a cemetery etc.
References in classic literature ?
Have I not said, old man, that neither hearse nor coffin can be thine?
Dirk and I alone followed the hearse to the cemetery.
And six mice built a little hearse to carry her to her grave; and when it was ready they harnessed themselves before it, and Chanticleer drove them.
We reached Venice at eight in the evening, and entered a hearse belonging to the Grand Hotel d'Europe.
Some years ago, I remember, there was a hearse with two horses returning one dark night, and just by Farmer Sparrow's house, where the pond is close to the road, the wheels went too near the edge, and the hearse was overturned into the water; both the horses were drowned, and the driver hardly escaped.
His son obeyed, and the crowd approached; they were bawling and hissing round a dingy hearse and dingy mourning coach, in which mourning coach there was only one mourner, dressed in the dingy trappings that were considered essential to the dignity of the position.
I should like the hearse to be followed by a long string of empty coaches, and I should like the horses to wear tall nodding plumes, and there should be a vast number of mutes with long streamers on their hats.
A plain coffin was bought, and a broken-down hearse hired; while, as security for this outlay, she seized the dead man's books and other articles.
A whisper, communicated from those who stood nearest the windows, now spread through the church; a hearse, with a train of several coaches, was creeping along the street, conveying some dead man to the churchyard, while the bride awaited a living one at the altar.
He gave his verses as "fittest flowers to deck his mournful hearse.
The commissary having been buried with all the decorations suitable to the service (the whole team of proprieties were harnessed to his hearse, and they all had feathers and black velvet housings with his coat of arms in the corner), Mrs General began to inquire what quantity of dust and ashes was deposited at the bankers'.
She was very superstitious; and the hearse and the letter convinced her that she was running the most serious dangers that evening.