heartiness


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Related to heartiness: hardiness

heart·y

 (här′tē)
adj. heart·i·er, heart·i·est
1. Expressed warmly, exuberantly, and unrestrainedly: a hearty welcome.
2. Complete or thorough; unequivocal: hearty support.
3. Vigorous; robust: a hearty glow of health.
4.
a. Enjoying or requiring much food: a hearty appetite.
b. Providing abundant nourishment; substantial: a hearty meal.
n. pl. heart·ies
1. A good fellow; a comrade.
2. A sailor.

heart′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heartiness - active strength of body or mindheartiness - active strength of body or mind  
strength - the property of being physically or mentally strong; "fatigue sapped his strength"
2.heartiness - the quality of hearty sincerity
sincerity - the quality of being open and truthful; not deceitful or hypocritical; "his sincerity inspired belief"; "they demanded some proof of my sincerity"

heartiness

noun
The condition of being physically and mentally sound:
Translations
حَماسِيَّه، وُدِّيَّه
srdečnost
hjertelighedsoliditet
vingjarnleiki, einlægni

heartiness

[ˈhɑːtɪnɪs] Nentusiasmo m
he spoke with a heartiness he did not feelhabló con un entusiasmo que no sentía
he shook my hand with exaggerated heartinessme estrechó la mano con una efusividad exagerada

heart

(haːt) noun
1. the organ which pumps blood through the body. How fast does a person's heart beat?; (also adjective) heart disease; a heart specialist.
2. the central part. I live in the heart of the city; in the heart of the forest; the heart of a lettuce; Let's get straight to the heart of the matter/problem.
3. the part of the body where one's feelings, especially of love, conscience etc are imagined to arise. She has a kind heart; You know in your heart that you ought to go; She has no heart (= She is not kind).
4. courage and enthusiasm. The soldiers were beginning to lose heart.
5. a symbol supposed to represent the shape of the heart; a white dress with little pink hearts on it; heart-shaped.
6. one of the playing-cards of the suit hearts, which have red symbols of this shape on them.
-hearted
kind-hearted; hard-hearted; broken-hearted.
ˈhearten verb
to encourage or cheer up. We were greatly heartened by the good news.
ˈheartless adjective
cruel; very unkind. a heartless remark.
ˈheartlessly adverb
ˈheartlessness noun
hearts noun plural
(sometimes treated as noun singular) one of the four card suits. the two of hearts.
ˈhearty adjective
1. very friendly. a hearty welcome.
2. enthusiastic. a hearty cheer.
3. very cheerful; too cheerful. a hearty person/laugh.
4. (of meals) large. He ate a hearty breakfast.
5. (of a person's appetite) large.
ˈheartily adverb
ˈheartiness noun
ˈheartache noun
(a feeling of) great sadness.
heart attack
a sudden failure of the heart to function correctly, sometimes causing death. My father has had a slight heart attack.
ˈheartbeat noun
(the sound of) the regular movement of the heart.
ˈheartbreak noun
(something which causes) great sorrow. I have suffered many heartbreaks in my life.
ˈheartbroken adjective
feeling very great sorrow. a heartbroken widow.
ˈheartburn noun
a burning feeling in the chest caused by indigestion. She suffers from heartburn after meals.
heart failure
the sudden stopping of the heart's beating. the old man died of heart failure.
ˈheartfelt adjective
sincere. heartfelt thanks.
ˌheart-to-ˈheart adjective
open and sincere, usually in private. I'm going to have a heart-to-heart talk with him.
noun
an open and sincere talk, usually in private. After our heart-to-heart I felt more cheerful.
ˈheart-warming adjective
causing a person to feel pleasure. It was heart-warming to see the happiness of the children.
at heart
really; basically. He seems rather stern but he is at heart a very kind man.
break someone's heart
to cause someone great sorrow. If you leave her, it'll break her heart.
by heart
from memory; by memorizing. The children know their multiplication tables by heart; Actors must learn their speeches (off) by heart.
from the bottom of one's heart
very sincerely. She thanked him from the bottom of her heart.
have a change of heart
to change a decision etc, usually to a better, kinder one. He's had a change of heart – he's going to help us after all.
have a heart!
show some pity!.
have at heart
to have a concern for or interest in. He has the interest of his workers at heart.
heart and soul
with all one's attention and energy. She devoted herself heart and soul to caring for her husband.
lose heart
to become discouraged.
not have the heart to
not to want or be unkind enough to (do something unpleasant). I don't have the heart to tell him that everyone laughed at his suggestions.
set one's heart on / have one's heart set on
to want very much. He had set his heart on winning the prize; He had his heart set on winning.
take heart
to become encouraged or more confident.
take to heart
1. to be made very sad or upset by. You mustn't take his unkind remarks to heart.
2. to pay attention to. He's taken my criticism to heart – his work has improved.
to one's heart's content
as much as one wants. She could play in the big garden to her heart's content.
with all one's heart
very willingly or sincerely. I hope with all my heart that you will be happy.
References in classic literature ?
in their cradles) they say nothing to me: to my mind they know too much and feel too obviously; I cannot stomach the heartiness with which they slap me on the back or the emotion with which they hurl themselves on my bosom; their passion seems to me a little anaemic and their dreams a trifle dull.
With these conciliatory expressions he suited the action to the word; and Hugh meeting his advances readily, they performed the ceremony with a show of great heartiness.
The openness and heartiness of her manner more than atoned for that want of recollection and elegance which made her often deficient in the forms of politeness; her kindness, recommended by so pretty a face, was engaging; her folly, though evident was not disgusting, because it was not conceited; and Elinor could have forgiven every thing but her laugh.
Watson's boisterous heartiness, and in a moment or two got up.
Repeating these words with great heartiness, and with a solemnity on his jolly face that made it look twice as large as before, he shook hands and went away.
At this point, however, the door opened and a tall burly man entered the room, came forward and shook Helen's hand with an emotional kind of heartiness, Willoughby himself, Rachel's father, Helen's brother-in-law.
It came to me straightway, under her contact, that, with plain heartiness, mere relieved anxiety at my appearance, she knew nothing whatever that could bear upon the incident I had there ready for her.
In the first place, there was so much heartiness, and so little ceremony, in the welcome accorded to us, that we almost fancied ourselves back in our own country.
both answered, with a heartiness that gratified him much.
The two shook hands with the greatest heartiness, and then went the wonderful length--for Englishmen--of laying their hands each on the other's shoulders, and looking joyfully each into the other's face.
Nevertheless his tone when he spoke lacked heartiness.
Nothing could exceed their joy on thus meeting with their old comrades, or the heartiness with which they were welcomed.