heat island


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

heat island

n.
An area, such as a city or industrial site, that has consistently higher temperatures than surrounding areas, as because of lack of vegetation, the low albedo of roofing materials and asphalt, and the production of waste heat by vehicles or buildings.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Urban Land Institute New York (ULI NY) has released a report outlining how the anticipated rezoning of Gowanus, Brooklyn can be used to mitigate a phenomenon known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect.
The so-called urban heat island effect is responsible for the extra heat being felt by cities.
Our cities and towns have now become recently hotter than their adjoining or nearby rural areas for various reasons and increasing green areas and planting more trees in the cities and towns is the most effective and cheapest way to cope with heat island effect that poses risk to lives and livelihoods in urban centres of the country,' Mushahidullah Khan noted.
He told the forest officials, 'Planting trees in urban centres must be made integral part of the seasonal monsoon and spring tree plantation campaigns and Prime Minister's Green Pakistan Programme (GPP) being implemented by the climate change ministry in collaboration with provincial forest departments to avert growing threat of heat island effect in urban areas that costs both lives and people's livelihoods.
Reflective pavement can go a long way toward reducing the urban heat island effect, but the embodied energy and emissions in some materials may present unexpected drawbacks, according to new research from the DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
6 times higher when heat island effects are taken into account than when they are not.
The urban heat island (UHI) is a phenomenon in which the air temperature in densely populated cities is higher than rural areas, this is, currently, the main character of the urban climate (Lopes, Alves, Alcoforado, & Machete, 2013; Lu, Li, Yang, Zhang, & Jin, 2012; Parlow et al.
In 2015, Alliance Data--which believes better data drives better decisions --joined with American Forests to lay the groundwork for a landmark study about the urban heat island effect and related air quality issues in Dallas, and the role of trees and greenspace to mitigate these climate issues.
Since climate change will bring a supplementary burden of heat exposure to cities everywhere, it is important to assess, as precisely as possible, which measures truly reduce urban heat island effects, with minimal negative impact.
Especially in the metropolitan area, the ground tends to retain heat, giving way to the urban heat island effect.
Not only are buildings packed so closely, there are few green spaces and most areas are covered with asphalt and concrete pavement and roads, thus contributing to what is known as the urban heat island or UHI phenomenon.
The heat island effect can be counteracted slightly by using white or reflective materials to build houses, roofs, pavements and roads, thus increasing the overall albedo of the city.