heath

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heath

 (hēth)
n.
1. Any of various usually low-growing shrubs of the genus Erica and other genera of the heath family, native to Europe and South Africa and having small evergreen leaves and small, colorful, urn-shaped flowers. Also called heather.
2. An extensive tract of uncultivated open land covered with herbage and low shrubs; a moor.

[Middle English, uncultivated land, from Old English hǣth; see kaito- in Indo-European roots.]

heath

(hiːθ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) Brit a large open area, usually with sandy soil and scrubby vegetation, esp heather
2. (Plants) Also called: heather any low-growing evergreen ericaceous shrub of the Old World genus Erica and related genera, having small bell-shaped typically pink or purple flowers
3. (Plants) any of several nonericaceous heathlike plants, such as sea heath
4. (Plants) Austral any of various heathlike plants of the genus Epacris: family Epacridaceae
5. (Zoology) any of various small brown satyrid butterflies of the genus Coenonympha, with coppery-brown wings, esp the large heath (C. tullia)
[Old English hǣth; related to Old Norse heithr field, Old High German heida heather]
ˈheathˌlike adj
ˈheathy adj

Heath

(hiːθ)
n
(Biography) Sir Edward (Richard George). 1916–2005, British statesman; leader of the Conservative Party (1965–75); prime minister (1970–74)

heath

(hiθ)

n.
1. a tract of open and uncultivated land; wasteland overgrown with shrubs.
2. any of various low-growing shrubs of the genera Erica or Calluna, as heather, common on such land.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English hǣth, c. Old Saxon hētha, Middle High German heide, Old Norse heithr, Gothic haithi]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heath - a low evergreen shrub of the family Ericaceaeheath - a low evergreen shrub of the family Ericaceae; has small bell-shaped pink or purple flowers
erica, true heath - any plant of the genus Erica
Bruckenthalia spiculifolia, spike heath - small evergreen mat-forming shrub of southern Europe and Asia Minor having stiff stems and terminal clusters of small bell-shaped flowers
Calluna vulgaris, heather, Scots heather, ling, broom - common Old World heath represented by many varieties; low evergreen grown widely in the northern hemisphere
Cassiope mertensiana, white heather - heath of mountains of western United States having bell-shaped white flowers
Connemara heath, Daboecia cantabrica, St. Dabeoc's heath - low straggling evergreen shrub of western Europe represented by several varieties with flowers from white to rose-purple
Bryanthus taxifolius, mountain heath, Phyllodoce caerulea - small shrub with tiny evergreen leaves and pink or purple flowers; Alpine summits and high ground in Asia and Europe and United States
Brewer's mountain heather, Phyllodoce breweri, purple heather - semi-prostrate evergreen herb of western United States
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
2.heath - a tract of level wasteland; uncultivated land with sandy soil and scrubby vegetation
barren, wasteland, waste - an uninhabited wilderness that is worthless for cultivation; "the barrens of central Africa"; "the trackless wastes of the desert"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom

heath

noun moorland, moor, scrub, upland, open country, heathland, common land The park contains natural heath, woods and wetland.
Translations

heath

[hiːθ] N (esp Brit) (= moor etc) → brezal m, páramo m (esp LAm) (also heather) → brezo m

heath

[ˈhiːθ] n (British)lande fheat haze nbrume f de chaleur

heath

n
(= moorland)Heide f; (= type of country)Heide f, → Heideland nt
(= plant)Heidekraut nt, → Erika f

heath

[hiːθ] n (Brit) (moor) → landa, brughiera; (plant) → erica, brugo
References in classic literature ?
Here there are extensive heaths, with a few clumps of old Scotch firs on the distant hill-tops: within the last ten years large spaces have been enclosed, and self-sown firs are now springing up in multitudes, so close together that all cannot live.
For gardens (speaking of those which are indeed princelike, as we have done of buildings), the contents ought not well to be under thirty acres of ground; and to be divided into three parts; a green in the entrance; a heath or desert in the going forth; and the main garden in the midst; besides alleys on both sides.
The road from Chiltern Grange is a lonely one, and at one spot it is particularly so, for it lies for over a mile between Charlington Heath upon one side and the woods which lie round Charlington Hall upon the other.
TWO Blighted Beings, haggard, lachrymose, and detested, met on a blasted heath in the light of a struggling moon.
The moon was full and broad in the dark blue starless sky, and the broken ground of the heath looked wild enough in the mysterious light to be hundreds of miles away from the great city that lay beneath it.
Traversing the hollow by the Vale of Heath, he mounted the opposite bank, and crossing the road which joins the villages of Hampstead and Highgate, made along the remaining portion of the heath to the fields at North End, in one of which he laid himself down under a hedge, and slept.
I touched the heath, it was dry, and yet warm with the beat of the summer day.
Vancouver," "Labrador," "The White Mountains," the very names, thus casually mentioned on a Surrey heath, seemed full of the sounding sea.
It was all rocky: however I got many birds' eggs; and, striking fire, I kindled some heath and dry sea-weed, by which I roasted my eggs.
The woods, the rivers, the lawns of Devon and of Dorset, attract the eye of the ingenious traveller, and retard his pace, which delay he afterwards compensates by swiftly scouring over the gloomy heath of Bagshot, or that pleasant plain which extends itself westward from Stockbridge, where no other object than one single tree only in sixteen miles presents itself to the view, unless the clouds, in compassion to our tired spirits, kindly open their variegated mansions to our prospect.
Leaving the thumbless archer and his brood, the wayfarers struck through the scattered huts of Emery Down, and out on to the broad rolling heath covered deep in ferns and in heather, where droves of the half-wild black forest pigs were rooting about amongst the hillocks.
Much of it was red with heather; much of the rest broken up with bogs and hags and peaty pools; some had been burnt black in a heath fire; and in another place there was quite a forest of dead firs, standing like skeletons.