heavy hydrogen


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Related to heavy hydrogen: tritium

heavy hydrogen

n.
An isotope of hydrogen with mass number greater than 1; deuterium or tritium.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

heavy hydrogen

n
(Elements & Compounds) another name for deuterium
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

heav′y hy′drogen


n.
either of the heavy isotopes of hydrogen, esp. deuterium.
[1930–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

heav·y hydrogen

(hĕv′ē)
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heavy hydrogen - an isotope of hydrogen which has one neutron (as opposed to zero neutrons in hydrogen)
isotope - one of two or more atoms with the same atomic number but with different numbers of neutrons
hydrogen atom - an atom of hydrogen
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Deuterated benzene (C6D6) is a form (called an isotopologue) of benzene (C6H6) in which the hydrogen atom ("H") is replaced with deuterium (heavy hydrogen) isotope ("D").
Elydrogen has two isotopes--normal hydrogen, with a mass of one, and deuterium or "heavy hydrogen," with a mass of two.
This produces almost no neutrons but instead fast, heavy electrons (muons), since it is based on nuclear reactions in ultra-dense heavy hydrogen (deuterium).
Already, according to one report, Rosetta has found unusual levels of heavy hydrogen, indicating that primordial comets didn't provide the Earth's oceans with water.
Water vapor streaming off the comet contains a higher fraction of "heavy hydrogen'' than the water on Earth does, scientists reported Wednesday.
Frequent replacement of heavy hydrogen gas cylinders as they are depleted increases the potential for handling accidents and connection leaks.
Hydrogen as fuel is processed from deuterium, or heavy hydrogen, which is abundant in the Philippines, Marcos said.