heavy-handed


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

heav·y-hand·ed

(hĕv′ē-hăn′dĭd)
adj.
1. Clumsy; awkward.
2. Tactless; indiscreet.
3. Oppressive; harsh.

heav′y-hand′ed·ness n.

heavy-handed

adj
1. clumsy
2. harsh and oppressive
ˌheavy-ˈhandedly adv
ˌheavy-ˈhandedness n

heav′y-hand′ed



adj.
1. clumsy; graceless.
2. oppressive; harsh.
[1625–35]
heav′y-hand′ed•ly, adv.
heav′y-hand′ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.heavy-handed - lacking physical movement skills, especially with the hands; "a bumbling mechanic"; "a bungling performance"; "ham-handed governmental interference"; "could scarcely empty a scuttle of ashes, so handless was the poor creature"- Mary H. Vorse
maladroit - not adroit; "a maladroit movement of his hand caused the car to swerve"; "a maladroit translation"; "maladroit propaganda"
2.heavy-handed - unjustly domineering; "incensed at the government's heavy-handed economic policies"; "a manager who rode roughshod over all opposition"
domineering - tending to domineer

heavy-handed

adjective
1. oppressive, harsh, Draconian, autocratic, domineering, overbearing heavy-handed police tactics
2. clumsy, awkward, bungling, inept, graceless, inexpert, maladroit, ham-handed (informal), like a bull in a china shop (informal), ham-fisted (informal) She tends to be a little heavy-handed.
clumsy efficient, gentle, competent, graceful, skilful, adept, adroit, smooth, effectual, dexterous

heavy-handed

adjective
1. Clumsily lacking in the ability to do or perform:
2. Lacking fluency or gracefulness:
Translations

heavy-handed

[ˌhevɪˈhændɪd] ADJ
1. (= clumsy, tactless) → torpe, patoso
2. (= harsh) → severo

heavy-handed

[ˌhɛvɪˈhændɪd] adj (clumsy, tactless) → pesante; (harsh, person) → che ha la mano pesante, severo/a
References in classic literature ?
I read "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers," and I liked its vulgar music and its heavy-handed sarcasm.
Congratulations to the police actions - both German and English - that kept the thuggish elements away from the pitch without being too heavy-handed.
"I think that the academics and the journalists succeeded pretty well in embarrassing the people of Kansas," Johnson told The New York Times, "And there was a sense that, `people are laughing at us, people think we're rubes, industry doesn't want to come here anymore.' This is very heavy-handed intimidation."
Margolick's evident skill as a writer does the reader a favor by not only providing historical information concerning a shamefully American socio-cultural event, but by doing so in a compelling narrative style that gives both the necessary context surrounding the event as well as an insightful analysis that manages to enlighten without being heavy-handed or overly academic and impenetrable.
The move has enraged local pet psychiatrist Mr Steve Fryer, who says the signs are heavy-handed and unsympathetic to people who have already buried their animals.
In studies of media manipulation, planned obsolescence and mindless search for status, Horowitz insists that Packard got the questions right, even when his solutions were vague, his prose heavy-handed and his research unscientific.
Mr Attwood, from Witham, Essex, accused the PRS of being "heavy-handed" and added: "It's total madness.
(Learning that Harris spent a year in Rome as an American Academy fellow adds nothing.) The idea of the artist as battered boxer is at once imprecise and heavy-handed; the works leave us to wonder how the images relate either to their stated respiration or to Harris's project more generally.
I would have swapped Diamond's rather heavy-handed swipe at the play for either of them, for Diamond's choreography, although neatly matched to the tuneful melodramatics of John Corigliano's Symphony No.
Americans United suspected that something other than a desire to ensure every American's access to the ballot box had motivated the senators (especially in the case of Helms, whose allies have used heavy-handed tactics to depress black voter turnout in his campaigns).
"The heavy-handed stance taken by politicians in banning sales of on-the-bone cuts of beef and lamb has created a consumer backlash," said partner Mr Richard Atkinson.
By systematically allegorizing all fleshly references out of the texts (in a procedure that is surely open to the charge of incorrect theology as well as to that of heavy-handed literary criticism), Boyle deprives Petrarch's message of its temporal core: where his point is that all things die, even Laura, Boyle removes the cosa bella mortal, at which point, what does it matter that "cosa bella mortal passa, e non dura" (Rime sparse 248)?