hebdomadal


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Related to hebdomadal: foregone, diligently, peaky

heb·dom·a·dal

 (hĕb-dŏm′ə-dəl)
adj.
Weekly.

heb·dom′a·dal·ly adv.

hebdomadal

(hɛbˈdɒmədəl) or

hebdomadary

adj
a rare word for weekly
hebˈdomadally adv

heb•dom•a•dal

(hɛbˈdɒm ə dl)

adj.
weekly: a hebdomadal journal.
[1605–15; < Late Latin]
heb•dom′a•dal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.hebdomadal - of or occurring every seven days; "a weekly visit"; "weekly paper"
periodic, periodical - happening or recurring at regular intervals; "the periodic appearance of the seventeen-year locust"
Translations

hebdomadal

adj (form)wöchentlich
References in classic literature ?
A little solace came at tea-time, in the shape of a double ration of bread--a whole, instead of a half, slice--with the delicious addition of a thin scrape of butter: it was the hebdomadal treat to which we all looked forward from Sabbath to Sabbath.
Parker ed., 1849); Minutes of Hebdomadal Council, 1854-66, 81, 117 (archived at Bodleian Library, Oxford University, ITC 1/2/2).
Demographic and surgical information was prospectively assessed in a dedicated database by the specialized ERAS nurse; accuracy of data entry was cross-checked by independent review during Hebdomadal audits.
These data say nothing about hebdomadal patterns of work time in the U.S.
Each set of measurements comprising gradual displaying of each of the webpage from the test set described in Table 1 was performed in different weekday and time of the day to avoid systematic circadian and hebdomadal errors.
If something is held on an a hebdomadal basis, how often is that?
(2) Those who unequivocally reject the historical allegorizing of critics like Taylor should not overlook the fact that Carroll was very fond of precisely this sort of political "dark conceit." Many of his minor works--for example, "The New Method of Evaluation as Applied to Pi," "The Blank Cheque: A Fable," and most of the other essays reprinted in Notes By an Oxford Chiel (1874), as well The Elections of the Hebdomadal Council (1866), Euclid and His Modem Rivals (1879), and other miscellaneous pieces such as his "morality play" on science in an 1877 letter to The Pall Mall Gazette (on which, see Taylor, 167)--exhibit a strong tendency to treat allegorically the topical squabbles of his day.
Such confidence in the supposed transparency of raw data, fostered by Graunt's Observations, is geared towards giving an illusory sense of control--the countable being the containable-but is deconstructed by Defoe, who recognized that the unfailing regularity and ostensible precision of the hebdomadal Bills belie the reality of the historical experience.