hebephrenia

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he·be·phre·ni·a

 (hē′bə-frē′nē-ə, -frĕn′ē-)
n.
A type of schizophrenia characterized by disorganized speech and behavior, flat or inappropriate affect, and sometimes silly or inappropriate mannerisms. Also called disorganized schizophrenia.

[Greek hēbē, youth (because the onset of the disorder typically occurs in adolescence or young adulthood) + -phrenia.]

he′be·phren′ic (-frĕn′ĭk, -frē′nĭk) adj.

hebephrenia

(ˌhiːbɪˈfriːnɪə)
n
(Psychiatry) a form of pubertal schizophrenia, characterized by hallucinations, delusions, foolish behaviour, and senseless laughter
[C20: New Latin, from Greek hēbē youth + -phrenia mental disorder, from phrēn mind]
hebephrenic adj

he•be•phre•ni•a

(ˌhi bəˈfri ni ə)

n.
a form of schizophrenia characterized by emotionless, incongruous, or silly behavior, intellectual deterioration, and hallucinations.
[1880–85; < Greek hēbē- (see hebetic) + -phrenia]
he`be•phren′ic (-ˈfrɛn ɪk) adj., n.

hebephrenia

a form of insanity or dementia praecox that can appear at puberty, characterized by foolish behavior and deterioration of the mental faculties.
See also: Insanity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hebephrenia - a form of schizophrenia characterized by severe disintegration of personality including erratic speech and childish mannerisms and bizarre behavior; usually becomes evident during puberty; the most common diagnostic category in mental institutions
dementia praecox, schizophrenia, schizophrenic disorder, schizophrenic psychosis - any of several psychotic disorders characterized by distortions of reality and disturbances of thought and language and withdrawal from social contact
Translations
hébéphrénie
References in periodicals archive ?
Much of the absurdist renderings of psychosis--Neary's echoes of "Simulation of General Paralysis," Cooper's acathisia--and the multiple diagnoses represented at the Magdalen Mental Mercyseat, melancholics, paranoids, hebephrenics, hypomanics, schizophrenics, Korsakow's syndrome, and catatonics--threaten to slip into this hysterical supercategory in much the same way that the neurasthenic and the obsessional collapse into the hysterical in "Psychology Notes.
Pynchon's vocabulary was fantastically recondite, and I still have the notebook in which I jotted down the meanings of oneiric, abreaction, runcible spoon, hebephrenics, Antinomian, rachitic, velleity, preterite, and a couple dozen other words impossible to use in ordinary conversation.