hectic


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hec·tic

 (hĕk′tĭk)
adj.
1. Characterized by intense activity, confusion, or haste: "There was nothing feverish or hectic about his vigor" (Erik Erikson).
2. Medicine Of, relating to, or being a fever that fluctuates during the day, as in tuberculosis or septicemia.
3. Consumptive; feverish.
4. Flushed.

[Middle English etik, recurring fever, from Old French etique, from Late Latin hecticus, from Greek hektikos, habitual, consumptive (as a fever), from hexis, habit, from ekhein, to be in a certain condition; see segh- in Indo-European roots.]

hectic

(ˈhɛktɪk)
adj
1. characterized by extreme activity or excitement
2. (Pathology) associated with, peculiar to, or symptomatic of tuberculosis (esp in the phrases hectic fever, hectic flush)
n
3. (Pathology) a hectic fever or flush
4. (Pathology) rare a person who is consumptive or who experiences a hectic fever or flush
[C14: from Late Latin hecticus, from Greek hektikos habitual, from hexis state, from ekhein to have]
ˈhectically, ˈhecticly adv

hec•tic

(ˈhɛk tɪk)

adj.
1. characterized by confused or hurried activity.
2. of or designating a fevered condition, as in tuberculosis, attended by flushed cheeks, hot skin, and emaciation.
3. affected with such fever; consumptive.
4. flushed; red.
[1350–1400; Middle English etyk < Middle French < Late Latin hecticus < Greek hektikós habitual, consumptive, adj. corresponding to héxis habit, state; see cachexia, -tic]
hec′ti•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.hectic - marked by intense agitation or emotion; "worked at a feverish pace"
agitated - troubled emotionally and usually deeply; "agitated parents"

hectic

hectic

adjective
1. Characterized by intense emotion and activity:
2. Being at a higher temperature than is normal or desirable:
Translations
مَشغول جِداً
horečnývzrušený
hektisk
erilsamur
karštligiškas
drudžainsnemierīgs
vročičen
hareketlikoşuşturmalı

hectic

[ˈhektɪk] ADJ (fig) → agitado
he has a hectic lifelleva una vida muy agitada
the hectic pace of modern lifeel ritmo agitado de la vida moderna
we had three hectic daystuvimos tres días llenos de frenética actividad
things are pretty hectic herevamos como locos
the journey was pretty hecticel viaje era para volverse loco

hectic

[ˈhɛktɪk] adj (= busy) [life, pace] → trépidant(e); [schedule] → très chargé(e); [day, year, period] → mouvementé(e)

hectic

adj (also Med) → hektisch; hectic colour (Med) → hektische Röte

hectic

[ˈhɛktɪk] adj (busy) → frenetico/a; (eventful) → movimentato/a

hectic

(ˈhektik) adjective
very busy; rushed. Life is hectic these days.

hec·tic

a. hético-a, febril; agitado-a; consumido-a, tísico-a.
References in classic literature ?
Naseby sat brooding in his study, that there was shown in upon him, on urgent business, a little hectic gentleman shabbily attired.
says Briggs (who was thinking of twenty- four years back, and that hectic young writing-master whose lock of yellow hair, and whose letters, beautiful in their illegibility, she cherished in her old desk upstairs).
Two hectic blotches came suddenly into her pale cheeks.
His flushed face reminded me of the more beautiful kind of consumptive--that hectic beauty of which we used to hear so much.
Because the Romans did in these instances what all prudent princes ought to do, who have to regard not only present troubles, but also future ones, for which they must prepare with every energy, because, when foreseen, it is easy to remedy them; but if you wait until they approach, the medicine is no longer in time because the malady has become incurable; for it happens in this, as the physicians say it happens in hectic fever, that in the beginning of the malady it is easy to cure but difficult to detect, but in the course of time, not having been either detected or treated in the beginning, it becomes easy to detect but difficult to cure.
It used to rend my heart to see her, so hollow were her cheeks becoming, so sunken her eyes, so hectic her face.
He remarked upon the cheeks of Athos the hectic hue of fever, which feeds upon itself; slow fever, pitiless, born in a fold of the heart, sheltering itself behind that rampart, growing from the suffering it engenders, at once cause and effect of a perilous situation.
The furnished room received its latest guest with a first glow of pseudo-hospitality, a hectic, haggard, perfunctory welcome like the specious smile of a demirep.
He had heard Miss Ophelia speak often of a cough, that all her medicaments could not cure; and even now that fervent cheek and little hand were burning with hectic fever; and yet the thought that Eva's words suggested had never come to him till now.
I have mentioned his dark locks--they were brushed sideways above a white and sufficiently expansive forehead; his cheek had a rather hectic freshness; his features might have done well on canvas, but indifferently in marble: they were plastic; character had set a stamp upon each; expression re-cast them at her pleasure, and strange metamorphoses she wrought, giving him now the mien of a morose bull, and anon that of an arch and mischievous girl; more frequently, the two semblances were blent, and a queer, composite countenance they made.
The expiring heat of the apartment—for its great size required a day to reduce its temperature—had given to her cheeks a bloom that exceeded their natural color, while the mild and melancholy features of Louisa were brightened with a faint tinge, that, like the hectic of disease, gave a painful interest to her beauty.
Lady Bertram could think nothing less, and Fanny shared her aunt's security, till she received a few lines from Edmund, written purposely to give her a clearer idea of his brother's situation, and acquaint her with the apprehensions which he and his father had imbibed from the physician with respect to some strong hectic symptoms, which seemed to seize the frame on the departure of the fever.