hedging

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hedge

 (hĕj)
n.
1. A row of closely planted shrubs or low-growing trees forming a fence or boundary.
2. A line of people or objects forming a barrier: a hedge of spectators along the sidewalk.
3.
a. A means of protection or defense, especially against financial loss: a hedge against inflation.
b. A securities transaction that reduces the risk on an existing investment position.
4. An intentionally noncommittal or ambiguous statement.
5. A word or phrase, such as possibly or I think, that mitigates or weakens the certainty of a statement.
v. hedged, hedg·ing, hedg·es
v.tr.
1. To enclose or bound with or as if with hedges.
2. To hem in, hinder, or restrict with or as if with a hedge.
3. To minimize or protect against the loss of by counterbalancing one transaction, such as a bet, against another.
v.intr.
1. To plant or cultivate hedges.
2. To take compensatory measures so as to counterbalance possible loss.
3. To avoid making a clear, direct response or statement.

[Middle English, from Old English hecg.]

hedg′er n.
hedg′y adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hedging - any technique designed to reduce or eliminate financial risk; for example, taking two positions that will offset each other if prices change
security, protection - defense against financial failure; financial independence; "his pension gave him security in his old age"; "insurance provided protection against loss of wages due to illness"
2.hedging - an intentionally noncommittal or ambiguous statement; "when you say `maybe' you are just hedging"
equivocation, evasion - a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth
Translations

hedging

[ˈhedʒɪŋ]
A. N
1. (Bot) → seto m vivo
2. (fig) (= evasions) → evasivas fpl
3. (Fin) → cobertura f
B. CPD hedging plant Nplanta f para seto vivo
References in classic literature ?
In the country there was draining and hedging, planting and clearing, until the next summer saw the whole country golden with the wheat crop.
There was the same sort of antithetic mixture in Martin Poyser: he was of so excellent a disposition that he had been kinder and more respectful than ever to his old father since he had made a deed of gift of all his property, and no man judged his neighbours more charitably on all personal matters; but for a farmer, like Luke Britton, for example, whose fallows were not well cleaned, who didn't know the rudiments of hedging and ditching, and showed but a small share of judgment in the purchase of winter stock, Martin Poyser was as hard and implacable as the north-east wind.
They did all kinds of men's work of preference, including well-sinking, hedging, ditching, and excavating, without any sense of fatigue.