heliograph

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he·li·o·graph

 (hē′lē-ə-grăf′)
n.
1. A device for transmitting messages by reflecting sunlight.
2. A device capable of imaging the surface and outer regions of the sun.
v. he·li·o·graphed, he·li·o·graph·ing, he·li·o·graphs
v.tr.
To send (a message) by heliograph.
v.intr.
To send a heliograph.

he′li·og′ra·pher (-ŏg′rə-fər) n.
he′li·o·graph′ic adj.
he′li·og′ra·phy (-ŏg′rə-fē) n.

heliograph

(ˈhiːlɪəʊˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf)
n
1. (Navigation) an instrument with mirrors and a shutter used for sending messages in Morse code by reflecting the sun's rays
2. (Astronomy) a device used to photograph the sun
heliographer n
heliographic, ˌhelioˈgraphical adj
ˌheliˈography n

he•li•o•graph

(ˈhi li əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf)
n.
1. a device for signaling or sending messages by means of a movable mirror that reflects beams of light, esp. sunlight, over a distance.
2. an instrument for photographing the sun, consisting of a camera and specially adapted telescope.
v.t., v.i.
3. to communicate by heliograph.
[1815–25]
he`li•og′ra•pher (-ˈɒg rə fər) n.
he`li•o•graph′ic (-ˈgræf ɪk) adj.
he`li•o•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.
he`li•og′ra•phy, n.

heliograph

A system of sending signals by flashing sunlight from a mirror, used in the 1800s.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heliograph - an apparatus for sending telegraphic messages by using a mirror to turn the sun's rays off and onheliograph - an apparatus for sending telegraphic messages by using a mirror to turn the sun's rays off and on
apparatus, setup - equipment designed to serve a specific function
Verb1.heliograph - signal by means of a mirror and the using the sun's rays
signal, signalise, signalize, sign - communicate silently and non-verbally by signals or signs; "He signed his disapproval with a dismissive hand gesture"; "The diner signaled the waiters to bring the menu"
Translations
héliographe

heliograph

[ˈhiːlɪəʊgrɑːf] Nheliógrafo m

heliograph

nHeliograf m
vtheliografisch übermitteln
References in classic literature ?
It was a lieutenant and a couple of privates of the 8th Hus- sars, with a stand like a theodolite, which the artilleryman told me was a heliograph.
Then a piece of mica, or a little pool, or even a highly-polished leaf will flash like a heliograph.
The image Niepce captured on metal plates, also called heliographs or sun prints, are considered the first try at photographic images.
In reviewing the state of the History Department, the first priority goes to enabling students to read heliographs as part of their reading assignments routine.