heliotrope


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he·li·o·trope

 (hē′lē-ə-trōp′)
n.
1.
a. Any of several plants of the genus Heliotropium, especially H. arborescens, native to Peru and having small, highly fragrant purplish flowers. Also called turnsole.
b. The garden heliotrope.
c. Any of various plants that turn toward the sun.
3. A moderate, light, or brilliant violet to moderate or deep reddish purple.

[Middle English elitrope (from Old English eliotropus) and French héliotrope, both from Latin hēliotropium, from Greek hēliotropion : hēlio-, helio- + tropos, turn; see trope.]

he′li·o·trope′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

heliotrope

(ˈhiːlɪəˌtrəʊp; ˈhɛljə-)
n
1. (Plants) any boraginaceous plant of the genus Heliotropium, esp the South American H. arborescens, cultivated for its small fragrant purple flowers
2. (Plants) garden heliotrope a widely cultivated valerian, Valeriana officinalis, with clusters of small pink, purple, or white flowers
3. (Plants) any of various plants that turn towards the sun
4. (Colours)
a. a bluish-violet to purple colour
b. (as adjective): a heliotrope dress.
5. (Surveying) an instrument used in geodetic surveying employing the sun's rays reflected by a mirror as a signal for the sighting of stations over long distances
6. (Minerals) another name for bloodstone
7. (Jewellery) another name for bloodstone
[C17: from Latin hēliotropium, from Greek hēliotropion, from hēlios sun + trepein to turn]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

he•li•o•trope

(ˈhi li əˌtroʊp, ˈhil yə-; esp. Brit. ˈhɛl yə-)

n.
1. any of numerous hairy plants of the genus Heliotropium, of the borage family, esp. H. arborescens, cultivated for its small, fragrant purple flowers.
2. any of various other plants, as the valerian.
3. any plant that turns toward the sun.
4. a light purple color; reddish lavender.
[1580–90; < Middle French héliotrope < Latin hēliotropium < Greek hēliotrópion; see helio-, -trope]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heliotrope - green chalcedony with red spots that resemble bloodheliotrope - green chalcedony with red spots that resemble blood
calcedony, chalcedony - a milky or greyish translucent to transparent quartz
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

heliotrope

[ˈhiːlɪətrəup] Nheliotropo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

heliotrope

n (Bot: = colour) → Heliotrop nt
adjheliotrop(isch)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Behind the chapel extended, surrounded by two high hedges of hazel, elder and white thorn, and a deep ditch, the little inclosure - uncultivated, though gay in its sterility; because the mosses there grew thick, wild heliotrope and ravenelles there mingled perfumes, while from beneath an ancient chestnut issued a crystal spring, a prisoner in its marble cistern, and on the thyme all around alighted thousands of bees from the neighboring plants, whilst chaffinches and redthroats sang cheerfully among the flower-spangled hedges.
It was racy and insolent with heliotrope; he hurled it to the floor.
So Laurie played and Jo listened, with her nose luxuriously buried in heliotrope and tea roses.
Shaw, laughing, as he watched the girl's face dimple and flush, as she smelt the lovely nosegay, and glanced at a note half hidden in the heliotrope.
This is illustrated by Turgenev's "Smoke," where the hero is long puzzled by a haunting sense that something in his present is recalling something in his past, and at last traces it to the smell of heliotrope. Whenever the sense of familiarity occurs without a definite object, it leads us to search the environment until we are satisfied that we have found the appropriate object, which leads us to the judgment: "THIS is familiar." I think we may regard familiarity as a definite feeling, capable of existing without an object, but normally standing in a specific relation to some feature of the environment, the relation being that which we express in words by saying that the feature in question is familiar.
That woman in heliotrope, who has just gone out of the room with your brother?
Close-fitting and black, with heliotrope silk facings under a figured net, it looked far from new, just on this side of shabbiness; in fact, it accentuated the slightness of her figure, it went well in its suggestion of half mourning with the white face in which the unsmiling red lips alone seemed warm with the rich blood of life and passion.
Meantime, of the broken keel of Ahab's wrecked craft the carpenter made him another leg; while still as on the night before, slouched Ahab stood fixed within his scuttle; his hid, heliotrope glance anticipatingly gone backward on its dial; sat due eastward for the earliest sun.
I recognised some euphorbias, with the caustic sugar coming from them; heliotropes, quite incapable of justifying their name, sadly drooped their clusters of flowers, both their colour and perfume half gone.
He could distinguish amid the perfumes of the roses and heliotropes in the flower-stands, the sharp and fragrant odor of volatile salts, and he noticed in one of the chased cups on the mantle-piece the countess's smelling-bottle, taken from its shagreen case, and exclaimed in a tone of uneasiness, as he entered, -- "My dear mother, have you been ill during my absence?"
This is the second time they've teamed up on a project --they also bought the former Lion's Inn Hotel and transformed it into the boutique Heliotrope Hotel in 2016.
Lisa Kohn; TO THE MOON AND BACK; Heliotrope Books (Nonfiction: Autobiography & Memoir) 16.50 ISBN: 9781942762447