heliotropic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

he·li·ot·ro·pism

 (hē′lē-ŏt′rə-pĭz′əm)
n.
Growth or orientation of a sessile organism, especially a plant, toward or away from the light of the sun.

he′li·o·tro′pic (-ə-trō′pĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

he•li•o•trop•ic

(ˌhi li əˈtrɒp ɪk, -ˈtroʊ pɪk)

adj.
turning or growing toward the light, esp. sunlight.
[1870–75]
he`li•o•trop′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

heliotropic

adjheliotrop(isch)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Patterson, "[t]he heliotropic calling of daisy to sun that [Chaucer] celebrated while awake is now refigured as the sovereignty of the tyrannical God of Love over his sacrificial consort Alceste.
Around 20 patients, mainly children aged 3-5 years, were taken to a hospital with heliotropic hepatitis last week, GBAO Health Care and Social Security Department Chief Nasrigul Nekushoyeva said on February 12.
Metabolites from the lichen Ochrolechia parella growing under two different heliotropic conditions.
It should be kept in mind that statins have a number of other life saving actions beyond lipids called "heliotropic effects".
Pathognomonic features are the heliotropic rash and Gottron's lesions.
Despite O Cidadan:poems intellectual attraction--that heliotropic effect--deciphering its meaning proves to be an insuperable task.
Hartman's readings of Wordsworth oscillate between "dark and light, or heliotropic or melantropic," extolling a poet who knew that to "deny imagination its darker food ...
Along with the same line of argument and extending her metaphorical analogy, this implicit disposition is evident also in the contrast she establishes between "shooting star" (illustrating the amatory flash/narrative) and the "sunflower" (standing for the theological heliotropic narrative).
Protein levels may vary as a result of a light stimulus, as would be assumed in heliotropic leaf movement, or by a rhythm endogenous to the plant and at least partially independent of external stimuli, such as daily nyctinastic leaf folding of S.
Worse still, by responding to nothing more than light emanating from numerous screens, we are more like photosensitive or heliotropic plants.