helm


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helm 1

 (hĕlm)
n.
1. Nautical The steering gear of a ship, especially the tiller or wheel.
2. A position of leadership or control: at the helm of the government.
tr.v. helmed, helm·ing, helms
To take the helm of; steer or direct.

[Middle English, from Old English helma.]

helm′er n.

helm 2

 (hĕlm) Archaic
n.
A helmet.
tr.v. helmed, helm·ing, helms
To cover or furnish with a helmet.

[Middle English, from Old English; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

helm

(hɛlm)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) nautical
a. the wheel, tiller, or entire apparatus by which a vessel is steered
b. the position of the helm: that is, on the side of the keel opposite from that of the rudder
2. a position of leadership or control (esp in the phrase at the helm)
vb
(tr) to direct or steer
[Old English helma; related to Old Norse hjalm rudder, Old High German halmo]
ˈhelmless adj

helm

(hɛlm)
n
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) an archaic or poetic word for helmet
vb
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) (tr) archaic or poetic to supply with a helmet
[Old English helm; related to helan to cover, Old Norse hjalmr, Gothic hilms, Old High German helm helmet, Sanskrit śárman protection]

helm1

(hɛlm)

n.
1.
a. a wheel or tiller by which a ship is steered.
b. the entire steering apparatus of a ship.
c. the angle with the fore-and-aft line made by a rudder when turned: 15-degree helm.
2. the place or post of control: A stern taskmaster was at the helm of the company.
v.t.
3. to steer; direct.
[before 900; Middle English helme, Old English helma, c. Old High German helmo, halmo handle, Old Norse hjalm rudder]

helm2

(hɛlm)

n.
1. a medieval helmet, formed as a single cylindrical piece with a flat or raised top, completely enclosing the head.
v.t.
2. to furnish with a helm.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old High German helm, Old Norse hjālmr, Gothic hilms; akin to Old English helan to cover. See hull1]

helm

- A nautical term meaning "to steer."
See also related terms for steer.

helm


Past participle: helmed
Gerund: helming

Imperative
helm
helm
Present
I helm
you helm
he/she/it helms
we helm
you helm
they helm
Preterite
I helmed
you helmed
he/she/it helmed
we helmed
you helmed
they helmed
Present Continuous
I am helming
you are helming
he/she/it is helming
we are helming
you are helming
they are helming
Present Perfect
I have helmed
you have helmed
he/she/it has helmed
we have helmed
you have helmed
they have helmed
Past Continuous
I was helming
you were helming
he/she/it was helming
we were helming
you were helming
they were helming
Past Perfect
I had helmed
you had helmed
he/she/it had helmed
we had helmed
you had helmed
they had helmed
Future
I will helm
you will helm
he/she/it will helm
we will helm
you will helm
they will helm
Future Perfect
I will have helmed
you will have helmed
he/she/it will have helmed
we will have helmed
you will have helmed
they will have helmed
Future Continuous
I will be helming
you will be helming
he/she/it will be helming
we will be helming
you will be helming
they will be helming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been helming
you have been helming
he/she/it has been helming
we have been helming
you have been helming
they have been helming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been helming
you will have been helming
he/she/it will have been helming
we will have been helming
you will have been helming
they will have been helming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been helming
you had been helming
he/she/it had been helming
we had been helming
you had been helming
they had been helming
Conditional
I would helm
you would helm
he/she/it would helm
we would helm
you would helm
they would helm
Past Conditional
I would have helmed
you would have helmed
he/she/it would have helmed
we would have helmed
you would have helmed
they would have helmed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.helm - steering mechanism for a vesselhelm - steering mechanism for a vessel; a mechanical device by which a vessel is steered
motorboat, powerboat - a boat propelled by an internal-combustion engine
sailing ship, sailing vessel - a vessel that is powered by the wind; often having several masts
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
steering mechanism, steering system - a mechanism by which something is steered (especially a motor vehicle)
towboat, tugboat, tug, tower - a powerful small boat designed to pull or push larger ships
wheel - a circular helm to control the rudder of a vessel
2.helm - a position of leadership; "the President is at the helm of the Ship of State"
leadership, leading - the activity of leading; "his leadership inspired the team"
Verb1.helm - be at or take the helm of; "helm the ship"
channelise, channelize, guide, maneuver, steer, manoeuver, manoeuvre, point, head, direct - direct the course; determine the direction of travelling

helm

noun (Nautical) tiller, wheel, rudder, steering gear I got into our dinghy while Willis took the helm.
at the helm in charge, in control, in command, directing, at the wheel, in the saddle, in the driving seat He has been at the helm of Lonrho for 31 years.
Translations
مِقْوَد، زمام الأمور
kormidlo
ror
stÿri
stūrestūresrats
dümen yekesi

helm

[helm] N (Naut) → timón m
to be at the helm (lit, fig) → estar al timón

helm

[ˈhɛlm] n
[ship] → barre f
to be at the helm [organization] → être à la barre

helm

n
(Naut) → Ruder nt, → Steuer nt; to be at the helm (lit, fig)am Ruder sein
(obs, = helmet) → Helm m

helm

[hɛlm] n (Naut) → timone m
to be at the helm (fig) → essere al comando

helm

(helm) noun
the wheel or handle by which a ship is steered. He asked me to take the helm (= steer the ship).
ˈhelmsman (ˈhelmz-) noun
a person who steers a ship.
References in classic literature ?
The continual sight of the fiend shapes before me, capering half in smoke and half in fire, these at last begat kindred visions in my soul, so soon as I began to yield to that unaccountable drowsiness which ever would come over me at a midnight helm.
You see," said Dantes, quitting the helm, "I shall be of some use to you, at least during the voyage.
Larboard your helm," cried the captain to the steersman.
The searchlight followed her, and a shudder ran through all who saw her, for lashed to the helm was a corpse, with drooping head, which swung horribly to and fro at each motion of the ship.
I let him take the helm, while the rest began a thorough search, all keeping abreast, with lanterns.
It was very pleasant, when I stayed late in town, to launch myself into the night, especially if it was dark and tempestuous, and set sail from some bright village parlor or lecture room, with a bag of rye or Indian meal upon my shoulder, for my snug harbor in the woods, having made all tight without and withdrawn under hatches with a merry crew of thoughts, leaving only my outer man at the helm, or even tying up the helm when it was plain sailing.
Evidently they thought they were witnessing an exhibition of poor seamanship, and they yelled their warnings to the tug to reduce speed and throw the helm hard to port.
I saw the helmsman lunge forward upon the wheel, pulling the helm around so that the tug sheered off quickly from her course, and I recall realizing that all our efforts were to be in vain, because of all the men aboard, Fate had decreed that this one should fall first to an enemy bullet.
But one living creature was on deck--the man at the helm, dozing peaceably with his arm over the useless tiller.
The sleeper at the helm woke; looked up at the idle sails, and yawned in sympathy with them; looked out at the sea on either side of him, and shook his head obstinately at the superior obstinacy of the calm.
AS WE all went up it occurred to me that there ought to be a man at the helm.
The helm, too, was knocked to leeward, all command of the vessel was lost, and another mountain wave completely overset her.