hematocele


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he•mat•o•cele

(hɪˈmæt əˌsil)

n.
1. hemorrhage into a cavity, as the cavity surrounding the testis.
2. such a cavity.
[1720–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hematocele - swelling caused by blood collecting in a body cavity (especially a swelling of the membrane covering the testis)
puffiness, swelling, lump - an abnormal protuberance or localized enlargement
Translations

hematocele

n hematocele m
References in periodicals archive ?
Although it has been considered a safe treatment modality, uncommon complications can occur, such as perirenal hematoma and hematocele of the scrotum, which may be severe and life-threatening.
Other disease processes that affect the scrotum include hydrocele or hematocele and scrotal hernia (5,11,13).
Hematocele: This is a collection of blood in the protective layers around the testicle.
Hemicastration of a Tennessee walking horse stallion with hematocele. Maria A.
[2] Ultrasonography: Large Scrotal exploration scrotal hematoma Inguinal orchiectomy Computed tomography: Large right-sided hematocele of mixed attenuation consistent with acute hemorrhage and evidence of extravasation of contrast at the superior pole of the hematocele
Edgar, "Ectopic gestation with formation of large hematocele and secondary rupture into upper third of sigmoid flexure," Glasgow Medical Journal, vol.
(26) Hematomas can occur in the scrotal wall, epididymis, testis, or tunica vaginalis (hematocele).
In the differential diagnosis of acute scrotum, testicular torsion, appendix testicular torsion, repairable or strangulated inguinal hernia, trauma caused by breech presentation, hematocele, scrotal abscess, malignancy, ectopic spleen and ectopic adrenal gland should be kept in mind, though rarely observed in the neonatal period.
Discussion Basic physical examination Other causes that may present as a scrotal mass: Epididymitis, orchitis, hydrocele, hematocele. Transillumination of scrotum Helps establish potential diagnosis and guide additional work-up.
In China, Crataegus was first mentioned in "New Materia Medica" The herb was used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, particularly in department of internal medicine, such as the food stagnation, nausea or vomiting, abdominal pain or diarrhea, hernia pain, hematocele in bosom, and postpartum lochia.
One may also consider hydrocele or hematocele in the differential diagnosis.