hence


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hence

 (hĕns)
adv.
1.
a. For this reason; therefore: handmade and hence expensive.
b. From this source: They grew up in the Sudan; hence their interest in Nubian art.
2. From this time; from now: A year hence it will be forgotten.
3.
a. From this place; away from here: Get you hence!
b. From this life.

[Middle English hennes, from here : henne (from Old English heonan; see ko- in Indo-European roots) + -es, adv. suff.; see -s3.]

hence

(hɛns)
sentence connector
for this reason; following from this; therefore
adv
1. from this time: a year hence.
2. archaic
a. from here or from this world; away
b. from this origin or source
interj
archaic begone! away!
[Old English hionane; related to Old High German hinana away from here, Old Irish cen on this side]

hence

(hɛns)

adv.
1. as an inference from this fact; for this reason; therefore.
2. from this time; from now: a month hence.
3. from this source or origin.
interj.
4. Obs. depart (usu. used imperatively).
[1225–75; Middle English hens, hennes=henne (Old English heonan) + -es -s1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.hence - (used to introduce a logical conclusion) from that fact or reason or as a result; "therefore X must be true"; "the eggs were fresh and hence satisfactory"; "we were young and thence optimistic"; "it is late and thus we must go"; "the witness is biased and so cannot be trusted"
2.hence - from this place; "get thee hence!"
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
3.hence - from this time; "a year hence it will be forgotten"

hence

conjunction
1. therefore, thus, consequently, for this reason, in consequence, ergo, on that account The Socialist Party was profoundly divided and hence very weak.
adverb
1. later, afterwards many years hence
Translations
بَعيدا عن هذا المكانلهذا السَّببمن هذا الوقت فصاعِدا
ode dneškaodsudodtudprototudíž
derforfølgeligtfra nuhennederaf
jotensiksi
ennélfogvaezentúlinnenmostantól
héîanhéîan í fráòess vegnaþess vegna
iš čianuo šioltaigi
kopšno šejienestādējāditādēļ
odteraz
bu andan itibarenbu nedenlebu yerdenbu yüzdenburadan

hence

[hens] ADV
1. (= therefore) → por lo tanto, de ahí
hence my letterde allí que le escribiera
hence the fact thatde ahí que ...
2. (frm) (time) five years hencede aquí a cinco años
3. (o.f.) (place) → de or desde aquí
hence! (poet) → ¡fuera de aquí!

hence

[ˈhɛns] adv
(= therefore) → d'où
and hence → et par conséquent
(= from now) two years hence → d'ici deux ans

hence

adv
(= for this reason)also; hence the namedaher der Name
(= from now) two years hencein zwei Jahren
(obs, liter, = from here) → von hier; (get thee) hence!hinweg (mit dir)! (liter); get thee hence, Satan!weiche, Satan! (liter)

hence

[hɛns] adv
a. (frm) (therefore) → per cui, dunque
b. (old) (place) → da qui, di qui
c. (frm) (time) 5 years henceda qui a 5 anni

hence

(hens) adverb
1. for this reason. Hence, I shall have to stay.
2. from this time. a year hence.
3. away from this place.
henceˈforth adverb
from now on. Henceforth I shall refuse to work with him.
References in classic literature ?
If we are all alive ten years hence, let's meet, and see how many of us have got our wishes, or how much nearer we are then than now," said Jo, always ready with a plan.
Whatever may be the truth, as respects the root and the genius of the Indian tongues, it is quite certain they are now so distinct in their words as to possess most of the disadvantages of strange languages; hence much of the embarrassment that has arisen in learning their histories, and most of the uncertainty which exists in their traditions.
Now we began to strengthen, and from hence, for the space of six weeks, we had skirmishes with Indians, in one quarter or other, almost every day.
Hence, too, might be drawn a weighty lesson from the little-regarded truth, that the act of the passing generation is the germ which may and must produce good or evil fruit in a far-distant time; that, together with the seed of the merely temporary crop, which mortals term expediency, they inevitably sow the acorns of a more enduring growth, which may darkly overshadow their posterity.
It would be too much in keeping with the scene to excite surprise, were we to look about us and discover a form, beloved, but gone hence, now sitting quietly in a streak of this magic moonshine, with an aspect that would make us doubt whether it had returned from afar, or had never once stirred from our fireside.
From hence the low murmur of his pupils' voices, conning over their lessons, might be heard in a drowsy summer's day, like the hum of a beehive; interrupted now and then by the authoritative voice of the master, in the tone of menace or command, or, peradventure, by the appalling sound of the birch, as he urged some tardy loiterer along the flowery path of knowledge.
But all the things that God would have us do are hard for us to do --remember that --and hence, he oftener commands us than endeavors to persuade.
Assuming the blubber to be the skin of the whale; then, when this skin, as in the case of a very large Sperm Whale, will yield the bulk of one hundred barrels of oil; and, when it is considered that, in quantity, or rather weight, that oil, in its expressed state, is only three fourths, and not the entire substance of the coat; some idea may hence be had of the enormousness of that animated mass, a mere part of whose mere integument yields such a lake of liquid as that.
Of intellectual and moral things, on the other hand, there was no limit, and one could have more without another's having less; hence "Communism in material production, anarchism in intellectual," was the formula of modern proletarian thought.
Hence, too, the Latin word vilis and our vile, also villain.
How the thought of her carries me back over wide seas of memory to a vague dim time, a happy time, so many, many centuries hence, when I used to wake in the soft summer mornings, out of sweet dreams of her, and say "Hello, Central
Hence, like most other BORDERING nations, they would always be either involved in disputes and war, or live in the constant apprehension of them.